Multiple modes of RNA recognition by zinc finger proteins

Multiple modes of RNA recognition by zinc finger proteins Zinc finger proteins are generally thought of as DNA-binding transcription factors; however, certain classes of zinc finger proteins, including the common C 2 H 2 zinc fingers, function as RNA-binding proteins. Recent structural studies of the C 2 H 2 zinc fingers of transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) and the CCCH zinc fingers of Tis11d in complex with their RNA targets have revealed new modes of zinc finger interaction with nucleic acid. The three C 2 H 2 zinc fingers of TFIIIA use two modes of RNA recognition that differ from the classical mode of DNA recognition, whereas the CCCH zinc fingers of Tis11d recognize specific AU-rich sequences through backbone atom interaction with the Watson–Crick edges of the adenine and uracil bases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Structural Biology Elsevier

Multiple modes of RNA recognition by zinc finger proteins

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-440x
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sbi.2005.04.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Zinc finger proteins are generally thought of as DNA-binding transcription factors; however, certain classes of zinc finger proteins, including the common C 2 H 2 zinc fingers, function as RNA-binding proteins. Recent structural studies of the C 2 H 2 zinc fingers of transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) and the CCCH zinc fingers of Tis11d in complex with their RNA targets have revealed new modes of zinc finger interaction with nucleic acid. The three C 2 H 2 zinc fingers of TFIIIA use two modes of RNA recognition that differ from the classical mode of DNA recognition, whereas the CCCH zinc fingers of Tis11d recognize specific AU-rich sequences through backbone atom interaction with the Watson–Crick edges of the adenine and uracil bases.

Journal

Current Opinion in Structural BiologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2005

References

  • The Pfam protein families database
    Bateman, A.; Coin, L.; Durbin, R.; Finn, R.D.; Hollich, V.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Khanna, A.; Marshall, M.; Moxon, S.; Sonnhammer, E.L.

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