Multi-scale analysis of urban sprawl in Europe: Towards a European de-sprawling strategy

Multi-scale analysis of urban sprawl in Europe: Towards a European de-sprawling strategy 1 Introduction</h5> The global human population will further increase by 30–70% in this century, which will lead to a population shift from rural to urban areas and to significant land-uptake for urban expansion ( Montgomery, 2008; Gerland et al., 2014; United Nations, 2014 ). The need for both more food production and urban development will fuel the conflict between each, i.e., the need for locations with valuable soils and for suitable construction ground. For example, the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) expects an increase of 43% in global food demand by 2030 ( FAO, 2011 ). While this competition is pronounced in continents with the strongest population increase, i.e., Africa and Asia ( Lambin et al., 2001; Chen, 2007; United Nations, 2014 ), it is also strong in other regions where more land is taken for urban areas because of higher land-uptake per person and increasing dispersion of built-up areas ( Eigenbrod et al., 2011 ).</P>Western and Central Europe are among the most densely populated regions (106 persons/km 2 in 2005) with 75% living in cities ( EEA, 2007, 2010 ). While there are several regions (e.g., East Germany) where the human population is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Use Policy Elsevier

Multi-scale analysis of urban sprawl in Europe: Towards a European de-sprawling strategy

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0264-8377
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.08.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The global human population will further increase by 30–70% in this century, which will lead to a population shift from rural to urban areas and to significant land-uptake for urban expansion ( Montgomery, 2008; Gerland et al., 2014; United Nations, 2014 ). The need for both more food production and urban development will fuel the conflict between each, i.e., the need for locations with valuable soils and for suitable construction ground. For example, the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) expects an increase of 43% in global food demand by 2030 ( FAO, 2011 ). While this competition is pronounced in continents with the strongest population increase, i.e., Africa and Asia ( Lambin et al., 2001; Chen, 2007; United Nations, 2014 ), it is also strong in other regions where more land is taken for urban areas because of higher land-uptake per person and increasing dispersion of built-up areas ( Eigenbrod et al., 2011 ).</P>Western and Central Europe are among the most densely populated regions (106 persons/km 2 in 2005) with 75% living in cities ( EEA, 2007, 2010 ). While there are several regions (e.g., East Germany) where the human population is

Journal

Land Use PolicyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2015

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