Monitoring the effects of timber harvest on annual water yield

Monitoring the effects of timber harvest on annual water yield Paired catchment studies have been used as a method to assess the effects of vegetation removal (timber harvesting) on streamflow responses including lowflows and peakflows, but particularly annual water yield. Paired catchment studies in the United States reporting on the effects of timber harvesting on annual water yields were compiled. In general, changes in annual water yield from forest cover reduction (or catchment area harvested) of less than 20% could not be determined by hydrometric or streamflow measurement methods. The catchment studies were discriminated by hydrologic region, defined by temperature and precipitation regimes. This regionalization suggested that as little as 15% of the catchment area (or basal area) could be harvested for a measurable increase in annual water yield at the catchment level in the Rocky Mountain region as compared with 50% in the Central Plains, although system responses are variable. Given changing world-wide objectives for forest land management, hydrologists will be asked to develop monitoring programs to assess the effects of multiple and temporally and spatially distributed land use activities on water resources. Less catchment area will be disturbed, thus monitoring programs must be carefully designed to obtain useful information. The concept of hydrologic recovery, i.e. return to pretreatment condition tends to be based on annual water yield, but also needs the evaluation of streamflow generation and routing mechanisms including lowflows and peakflows when compared with the pretreatment condition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrology Elsevier

Monitoring the effects of timber harvest on annual water yield

Journal of Hydrology, Volume 176 (1) – Mar 1, 1996

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/monitoring-the-effects-of-timber-harvest-on-annual-water-yield-CM9hu4Rig2
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0022-1694
eISSN
1879-2707
D.O.I.
10.1016/0022-1694(95)02780-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Paired catchment studies have been used as a method to assess the effects of vegetation removal (timber harvesting) on streamflow responses including lowflows and peakflows, but particularly annual water yield. Paired catchment studies in the United States reporting on the effects of timber harvesting on annual water yields were compiled. In general, changes in annual water yield from forest cover reduction (or catchment area harvested) of less than 20% could not be determined by hydrometric or streamflow measurement methods. The catchment studies were discriminated by hydrologic region, defined by temperature and precipitation regimes. This regionalization suggested that as little as 15% of the catchment area (or basal area) could be harvested for a measurable increase in annual water yield at the catchment level in the Rocky Mountain region as compared with 50% in the Central Plains, although system responses are variable. Given changing world-wide objectives for forest land management, hydrologists will be asked to develop monitoring programs to assess the effects of multiple and temporally and spatially distributed land use activities on water resources. Less catchment area will be disturbed, thus monitoring programs must be carefully designed to obtain useful information. The concept of hydrologic recovery, i.e. return to pretreatment condition tends to be based on annual water yield, but also needs the evaluation of streamflow generation and routing mechanisms including lowflows and peakflows when compared with the pretreatment condition.

Journal

Journal of HydrologyElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 1996

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off