Molecular changes in gelatin aging observed by NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy

Molecular changes in gelatin aging observed by NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy The pharmaceutical industry requires a narrow variability in gelatin properties during storage to meet strict quality standards for hard capsules. To test the properties of gelatin during shelf life, gelatin is aged in high temperature and high humidity conditions. These conditions induce the formation of cross-links in gelatin chains that impact its chemical composition and thereby the properties of the capsules. Non-aged and aged pig skin gelatins were analyzed in raw granule or powder forms by near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanisms of cross-link formation during aging. Both near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy clearly separated non-aged from aged samples. Aging induced the formation of dityrosine and other cross-links involving amine and aldehyde functions. The presence of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a fluorescent product of tyrosine oxidation involved in cross-link formation, was evidenced in gelatin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Hydrocolloids Elsevier

Molecular changes in gelatin aging observed by NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/molecular-changes-in-gelatin-aging-observed-by-nir-and-fluorescence-zva5F7lYV0
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0268-005X
eISSN
1873-7137
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodhyd.2016.06.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The pharmaceutical industry requires a narrow variability in gelatin properties during storage to meet strict quality standards for hard capsules. To test the properties of gelatin during shelf life, gelatin is aged in high temperature and high humidity conditions. These conditions induce the formation of cross-links in gelatin chains that impact its chemical composition and thereby the properties of the capsules. Non-aged and aged pig skin gelatins were analyzed in raw granule or powder forms by near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanisms of cross-link formation during aging. Both near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy clearly separated non-aged from aged samples. Aging induced the formation of dityrosine and other cross-links involving amine and aldehyde functions. The presence of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a fluorescent product of tyrosine oxidation involved in cross-link formation, was evidenced in gelatin.

Journal

Food HydrocolloidsElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off