Modelling the dorsal root ganglia using human pluripotent stem cells: A platform to study peripheral neuropathies

Modelling the dorsal root ganglia using human pluripotent stem cells: A platform to study... Sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are the primary responders to stimuli inducing feelings of touch, pain, temperature, vibration, pressure and muscle tension. They consist of multiple subpopulations based on their morphology, molecular and functional properties. Our understanding of DRG sensory neurons has been predominantly driven by rodent studies and using transformed cell lines, whereas less is known about human sensory DRG neurons simply because of limited availability of human tissue. Although these previous studies have been fundamental for our understanding of the sensory system, it is imperative to profile human DRG subpopulations as it is becoming evident that human sensory neurons do not share the identical molecular and functional properties found in other species. Furthermore, there are wide range of diseases and disorders that directly/indirectly cause sensory neuronal degeneration or dysfunctionality. Having an in vitro source of human DRG sensory neurons is paramount for studying their development, unique neuronal properties and for accelerating regenerative therapies to treat sensory neuropathies. Here we review the major studies describing generation of DRG sensory neurons from human pluripotent stem cells and fibroblasts and the gaps that need to be addressed for using in vitro-generated human DRG neurons to model human DRG tissue. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology Elsevier

Modelling the dorsal root ganglia using human pluripotent stem cells: A platform to study peripheral neuropathies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/modelling-the-dorsal-root-ganglia-using-human-pluripotent-stem-cells-a-8flZm1gNJm
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1357-2725
eISSN
1878-5875
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.biocel.2018.05.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are the primary responders to stimuli inducing feelings of touch, pain, temperature, vibration, pressure and muscle tension. They consist of multiple subpopulations based on their morphology, molecular and functional properties. Our understanding of DRG sensory neurons has been predominantly driven by rodent studies and using transformed cell lines, whereas less is known about human sensory DRG neurons simply because of limited availability of human tissue. Although these previous studies have been fundamental for our understanding of the sensory system, it is imperative to profile human DRG subpopulations as it is becoming evident that human sensory neurons do not share the identical molecular and functional properties found in other species. Furthermore, there are wide range of diseases and disorders that directly/indirectly cause sensory neuronal degeneration or dysfunctionality. Having an in vitro source of human DRG sensory neurons is paramount for studying their development, unique neuronal properties and for accelerating regenerative therapies to treat sensory neuropathies. Here we review the major studies describing generation of DRG sensory neurons from human pluripotent stem cells and fibroblasts and the gaps that need to be addressed for using in vitro-generated human DRG neurons to model human DRG tissue.

Journal

The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell BiologyElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off