Modelling interacting plant and livestock renewal dynamics helps disentangle equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects in a Mongolian pastoral system

Modelling interacting plant and livestock renewal dynamics helps disentangle equilibrium and... The interplay of livestock density dependence drivers and climate hazards is thought to cause pasture deterioration and poverty in Mongolian pastoral systems. We assessed their relative weights in a system of the Gobi exposed to high rainfall variability and harsh winters, which suggests that climate is the main system's driver. In this aim we modelled how interacting plant and livestock renewal dynamics impact herder performances, under the influence of climate. Plant dynamics was studied through an underground biomass sub-model because local pastures are dominated by perennial species. This approach enabled us studying pastoral issues in a holistic way, by integrating plant underground organs, livestock populations, herder income, and climate drivers. Models described that current grazing practices can significantly reduce underground biomass (−30% after 20years), but not entirely deplete it. They also showed that competition between herders could trap the smallest ones in poverty, by preventing the growth of their herds. This competition operates through density dependent factors affecting livestock productivity and vulnerability to climate shocks. This competition effect is all the more important since small herders could grow their herd and escape poverty if they were alone in the system. This result shows that density dependent factors could significantly impact herder performances and suggests that forage resource allocation is a driver as powerful as climate, even in the local harsh bioclimatic configuration of the Mongolian Gobi. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science of the Total Environment Elsevier

Modelling interacting plant and livestock renewal dynamics helps disentangle equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects in a Mongolian pastoral system

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/modelling-interacting-plant-and-livestock-renewal-dynamics-helps-16c0d0qSIf
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.215
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The interplay of livestock density dependence drivers and climate hazards is thought to cause pasture deterioration and poverty in Mongolian pastoral systems. We assessed their relative weights in a system of the Gobi exposed to high rainfall variability and harsh winters, which suggests that climate is the main system's driver. In this aim we modelled how interacting plant and livestock renewal dynamics impact herder performances, under the influence of climate. Plant dynamics was studied through an underground biomass sub-model because local pastures are dominated by perennial species. This approach enabled us studying pastoral issues in a holistic way, by integrating plant underground organs, livestock populations, herder income, and climate drivers. Models described that current grazing practices can significantly reduce underground biomass (−30% after 20years), but not entirely deplete it. They also showed that competition between herders could trap the smallest ones in poverty, by preventing the growth of their herds. This competition operates through density dependent factors affecting livestock productivity and vulnerability to climate shocks. This competition effect is all the more important since small herders could grow their herd and escape poverty if they were alone in the system. This result shows that density dependent factors could significantly impact herder performances and suggests that forage resource allocation is a driver as powerful as climate, even in the local harsh bioclimatic configuration of the Mongolian Gobi.

Journal

Science of the Total EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off