Modeling root growth and the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum of cotton crops

Modeling root growth and the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum of cotton crops A simple and functional model to simulate cotton root growth is coupled to models of water balance and leaf water potential to predict the behavior of the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum (SPAC) of cotton crops. The root-growth model takes into account the dry matter partitioning to roots, root depth increase as a function of thermal time, soil mechanical resistance and soil water stress, and allows the inclusion of spatial variability of soil physical properties. The water balance model uses a cascade approach to simulate drainage while soil and plant evaporation are calculated separately following the model of Ritchie. The leaf water potential model (LWPM) is based on Ohm’s Law analogy, where water flow resistance to the roots is calculated using an empirical equation and the resistance within the plant is calculated as a function of a threshold leaf water potential. The model simulated correctly the soil resistance and the temporal and spatial distribution of roots in the soil profile. The model simulated total soil water content and midday leaf water potential well, even when a compacted soil layer was present, but the agreement to observed data was poor for the vertical distribution of soil water content, mainly in the zone of greatest root concentration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Agricultural Water Management Elsevier

Modeling root growth and the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum of cotton crops

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0378-3774
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0378-3774(02)00165-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A simple and functional model to simulate cotton root growth is coupled to models of water balance and leaf water potential to predict the behavior of the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum (SPAC) of cotton crops. The root-growth model takes into account the dry matter partitioning to roots, root depth increase as a function of thermal time, soil mechanical resistance and soil water stress, and allows the inclusion of spatial variability of soil physical properties. The water balance model uses a cascade approach to simulate drainage while soil and plant evaporation are calculated separately following the model of Ritchie. The leaf water potential model (LWPM) is based on Ohm’s Law analogy, where water flow resistance to the roots is calculated using an empirical equation and the resistance within the plant is calculated as a function of a threshold leaf water potential. The model simulated correctly the soil resistance and the temporal and spatial distribution of roots in the soil profile. The model simulated total soil water content and midday leaf water potential well, even when a compacted soil layer was present, but the agreement to observed data was poor for the vertical distribution of soil water content, mainly in the zone of greatest root concentration.

Journal

Agricultural Water ManagementElsevier

Published: May 23, 2003

References

  • Modeling root growth of wheat as linkage between crop and soil
    Asseng, S.; Richter, C.; Wessolek, G.
  • Influence of a compacted subsoil layer on growth and yield of irrigated cotton in Southern Spain
    Coelho, M.B.; Mateos, L.; Villalobos, F.J.
  • A dynamic model of crop growth and partitioning of biomass
    Connor, D.J.; Fereres, E.
  • Dynamic aspects of water availability to plants
    Gardner, W.R.
  • Model for predicting evaporation from a row crop with incomplete cover
    Ritchie, J.T.

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