Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus salivarious Li01 for enhanced storage viability and targeted delivery to gut microbiota

Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus salivarious Li01 for enhanced storage viability and targeted... Probiotics are used in food products, dietary supplements and pharmaceutical products because they may provide health-promoting effects in humans. To be efficacious, probiotics need to be viable at sufficient abundance within the large intestine. However, many commercial products containing probiotics suffer from a substantial loss of bacterial viability during shelf storage and during gastrointestinal transit. In this study, a probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarious Li01) was incorporated into either alginate or alginate-gelatin microgels. The morphology of the microgels was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that they had a spherical shape and that almost all of the bacterial cells were encapsulated inside them. Probiotic viability was determined under aerobic conditions, heat treatment, and simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Encapsulation significantly enhanced the viability of the probiotic during aerobic storage. The microgels maintained their structures under simulated gastric conditions, but either eroded or swelled under simulated small intestine conditions. The alginate-gelatin microgels were the most effective at protecting the bacteria under simulated gastrointestinal conditions when compared to the alginate microgels and non-encapsulated bacteria. In conclusion, alginate-gelatin microgels have great potential for the protection and delivery of probiotics in food, supplement, and pharmaceutical products. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Hydrocolloids Elsevier

Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus salivarious Li01 for enhanced storage viability and targeted delivery to gut microbiota

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0268-005X
eISSN
1873-7137
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodhyd.2017.05.033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Probiotics are used in food products, dietary supplements and pharmaceutical products because they may provide health-promoting effects in humans. To be efficacious, probiotics need to be viable at sufficient abundance within the large intestine. However, many commercial products containing probiotics suffer from a substantial loss of bacterial viability during shelf storage and during gastrointestinal transit. In this study, a probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarious Li01) was incorporated into either alginate or alginate-gelatin microgels. The morphology of the microgels was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that they had a spherical shape and that almost all of the bacterial cells were encapsulated inside them. Probiotic viability was determined under aerobic conditions, heat treatment, and simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Encapsulation significantly enhanced the viability of the probiotic during aerobic storage. The microgels maintained their structures under simulated gastric conditions, but either eroded or swelled under simulated small intestine conditions. The alginate-gelatin microgels were the most effective at protecting the bacteria under simulated gastrointestinal conditions when compared to the alginate microgels and non-encapsulated bacteria. In conclusion, alginate-gelatin microgels have great potential for the protection and delivery of probiotics in food, supplement, and pharmaceutical products.

Journal

Food HydrocolloidsElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2017

References

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