Microbial biomass associated with water-stable aggregates in forest, savanna and cropland soils of a seasonally dry tropical region, India

Microbial biomass associated with water-stable aggregates in forest, savanna and cropland soils... The distribution of microbial biomass associated with water-stable macro- and microaggregates in soils was studied along a forest-savanna-cropland gradient. In both macro- and microaggregates, mean microbial biomass C, N and P were maximum in forest and minimum in cropland soils. At all the sites microbial C was greater in the macroaggregate than the microaggregate size class, whereas microbial biomass N and P were greater in the microaggregates. The microbial C-to-nutrient ratios were lower for the microaggregates compared to macroaggregates. It is possible that these two size classes support two different types or components (fungi-dominated and bacteria-dominated) of the food web in soil. There was a decrease in the amount of microbial C, N and P in both macro- and microaggregates along the forest-savanna-cropland gradient, which was due to the reduction of total soil organic matter. Total soil organic C and total N showed significant positive relations with both macro- and microaggregate microbial C and N, indicating that the latter are limited by the quantity of soil organic matter. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Soil Biology and Biochemistry Elsevier

Microbial biomass associated with water-stable aggregates in forest, savanna and cropland soils of a seasonally dry tropical region, India

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/microbial-biomass-associated-with-water-stable-aggregates-in-forest-eVSZtUMjWb
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0038-0717
D.O.I.
10.1016/0038-0717(95)00014-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The distribution of microbial biomass associated with water-stable macro- and microaggregates in soils was studied along a forest-savanna-cropland gradient. In both macro- and microaggregates, mean microbial biomass C, N and P were maximum in forest and minimum in cropland soils. At all the sites microbial C was greater in the macroaggregate than the microaggregate size class, whereas microbial biomass N and P were greater in the microaggregates. The microbial C-to-nutrient ratios were lower for the microaggregates compared to macroaggregates. It is possible that these two size classes support two different types or components (fungi-dominated and bacteria-dominated) of the food web in soil. There was a decrease in the amount of microbial C, N and P in both macro- and microaggregates along the forest-savanna-cropland gradient, which was due to the reduction of total soil organic matter. Total soil organic C and total N showed significant positive relations with both macro- and microaggregate microbial C and N, indicating that the latter are limited by the quantity of soil organic matter.

Journal

Soil Biology and BiochemistryElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 1995

References

  • Statistical Methods
    Snedecor, G.W.; Cochran, W.G.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off