Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection shows increase of putrescine in erythrocytes of Parkinson's disease patients

Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection shows increase... A highly sensitive method was developed to measure putrescine by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection with excellent linearity in the 1 nM to 3 μM range. The technique was tested on a drop of blood from Parkinson's disease patients obtained by finger prick. The results showed a statistically significant increase of putrescine in the erythrocytes compared to controls and a non-significant increase in plasma. This high level of putrescine does not constitute by itself proof that putrescine and polyamines are directly related to Parkinson's disease. However, the present results and several others addressed in the discussion suggest that these compounds might be causally involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. In addition, the analytical method reported here may help to find new biomarkers for many diseases including Parkinson's disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Chromatography B Elsevier

Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection shows increase of putrescine in erythrocytes of Parkinson's disease patients

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
1570-0232
eISSN
1873-376X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jchromb.2018.02.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A highly sensitive method was developed to measure putrescine by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection with excellent linearity in the 1 nM to 3 μM range. The technique was tested on a drop of blood from Parkinson's disease patients obtained by finger prick. The results showed a statistically significant increase of putrescine in the erythrocytes compared to controls and a non-significant increase in plasma. This high level of putrescine does not constitute by itself proof that putrescine and polyamines are directly related to Parkinson's disease. However, the present results and several others addressed in the discussion suggest that these compounds might be causally involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. In addition, the analytical method reported here may help to find new biomarkers for many diseases including Parkinson's disease.

Journal

Journal of Chromatography BElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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