Meta-analysis of short- and mid-term efficacy of ketamine in unipolar and bipolar depression

Meta-analysis of short- and mid-term efficacy of ketamine in unipolar and bipolar depression 1 Introduction</h5> Major depression is highly frequent and disabling with important functional and health consequences, possibly with vital prognosis ( Kessler et al., 2003; Collins et al., 2011 ). Pharmacological treatments currently available contribute to largely improve the depressive symptomatology, mainly by modulating the monoamine systems ( Murrough and Charney, 2012 ). However, the improvement of depressive symptomatology may occur several weeks after the pharmacological administration. This situation makes necessary research in the field, especially to assess drugs capable of modulating systems other than monoamine systems with the aim to shorten the time for obtaining the improvement of depressive symptoms.</P>These last years, ketamine, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist which may affect the glutamatergic system, has been proposed of major interest in depression since many reports showed a marked antidepressive effect in the very hours following the administration of a single dose ( Stahl, 2013; Ghasemi et al., 2014; Dutta et al., 2015 ). However, these reports included small clinical samples with a great clinical and medical heterogeneity. For example, some studies assessed the ketamine's effects in unipolar samples, others in bipolar samples; some studies reported the ketamine's effects in the hour, others in the 14 days following http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatry Research Elsevier

Meta-analysis of short- and mid-term efficacy of ketamine in unipolar and bipolar depression

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd
ISSN
0165-1781
DOI
10.1016/j.psychres.2015.10.032
pmid
26548981
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Major depression is highly frequent and disabling with important functional and health consequences, possibly with vital prognosis ( Kessler et al., 2003; Collins et al., 2011 ). Pharmacological treatments currently available contribute to largely improve the depressive symptomatology, mainly by modulating the monoamine systems ( Murrough and Charney, 2012 ). However, the improvement of depressive symptomatology may occur several weeks after the pharmacological administration. This situation makes necessary research in the field, especially to assess drugs capable of modulating systems other than monoamine systems with the aim to shorten the time for obtaining the improvement of depressive symptoms.</P>These last years, ketamine, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist which may affect the glutamatergic system, has been proposed of major interest in depression since many reports showed a marked antidepressive effect in the very hours following the administration of a single dose ( Stahl, 2013; Ghasemi et al., 2014; Dutta et al., 2015 ). However, these reports included small clinical samples with a great clinical and medical heterogeneity. For example, some studies assessed the ketamine's effects in unipolar samples, others in bipolar samples; some studies reported the ketamine's effects in the hour, others in the 14 days following

Journal

Psychiatry ResearchElsevier

Published: Dec 15, 2015

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