Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in microdialysates from nucleus tractus solitarii in piglets during normoxia and hypoxia

Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in microdialysates from nucleus tractus solitarii in piglets... Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in microdialysates from the respiratory-related nucleus tractus solitarii was determined simultaneously with ventilatory responses in seven, spontaneously breathing, developing swine under conditions of normoxia, hypoxia and recovery from hypoxia for 30 min each. Assayed levels of Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in normoxia were 0.89±0.23 pg/μl. These levels increased to 203.6±32.2% and 283.1±55.8% of control during hypoxia and recovery, respectively. Hyperventilation during hypoxia was not sustained, comprising brief stimulation followed by return to near-control level. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that opioid release may contribute to the suppression of ventilation in hypoxia during development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Elsevier

Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in microdialysates from nucleus tractus solitarii in piglets during normoxia and hypoxia

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-8993
DOI
10.1016/0006-8993(95)00541-W
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in microdialysates from the respiratory-related nucleus tractus solitarii was determined simultaneously with ventilatory responses in seven, spontaneously breathing, developing swine under conditions of normoxia, hypoxia and recovery from hypoxia for 30 min each. Assayed levels of Met-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in normoxia were 0.89±0.23 pg/μl. These levels increased to 203.6±32.2% and 283.1±55.8% of control during hypoxia and recovery, respectively. Hyperventilation during hypoxia was not sustained, comprising brief stimulation followed by return to near-control level. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that opioid release may contribute to the suppression of ventilation in hypoxia during development.

Journal

Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Jul 31, 1995

References

  • Neurochemicals and respiratory control during development
    Moss, I.R.; Inman, J.G.

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