Mesozoic plate tectonic reconstruction of the Carpathian region

Mesozoic plate tectonic reconstruction of the Carpathian region Palaeomagnetic, palaeobiogeographic and structural comparisons of different parts of the Alpine–Carpathian region suggest that four terranes comprise this area: the Alcapa, Tisza, Dacia and Adria terranes. These terranes are composed of different Mesozoic continental and oceanic fragments that were each assembled during a complex Late Jurassic–Cretaceous–Palaeogene history. Palaeomagnetic and tectonic data suggest that the Carpathians are built up by two major oroclinal bends. The Alcapa bend has the Meliata oceanic unit, correlated with the Dinaric Vardar ophiolite, in its core. It is composed of the Western Carpathians, Eastern Alps and Southern Alcapa units (Transdanubian Range, Bükk). This terrane finds its continuation in the High Karst margin of the Dinarides. Further elements of the Alcapa terrane are thought to be derived from collided microcontinents: Czorsztyn in the N and a carbonate unit (Tisza?) in the SE. The Tisza–Dacia bend has the Vardar oceanic unit in its core. It is composed of the Bihor and Getic microcontinents. This terrane finds its continuation in the Serbo–Macedonian Massif of the Balkans. The Bihor–Getic microcontinent originally laid east of the Western Carpathians and filled the present Carpathian embayment in the Late Palaeozoic–Early Mesozoic. The Vardar ocean occupied an intermediate position between the Western Carpathian–Austroalpine–Transdanubian–High Karst margin and the Bihor–Getic–Serbo–Macedonian microcontinent. The Vardar and Pindos oceans were opened in the heart of the Mediterranean–Adriatic microcontinent in the Late Permian–Middle Triassic. Vardar subducted by the end of Jurassic, causing the Bihor–Getic–Serbo–Macedonian microcontinent to collide with the internal Dinaric–Western Carpathian margin. An external Penninic–Váhic ocean tract began opening in the Early Jurassic, separating the Austroalpine–Western Carpathian microcontinent (and its fauna) from the European shelf. Further east, the Severin–Ceahlau–Magura also began opening in the Early Jurassic, but final separation of the Bihor–Getic ribbon (and its fauna) from the European shelf did not take place until the late Middle Jurassic. The Alcapa and the Tisza–Dacia were bending during the Albian–Maastrichtian. The two oroclinal bends were finally opposed and pushed into the gates of the Carpathian embayment during the Palaeogene and Neogene. At that time, the main N–S shortening in distant Alpine and Hellenic sectors was linked by a broader right-lateral shear zone along the former Vardar suture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology" Elsevier

Mesozoic plate tectonic reconstruction of the Carpathian region

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/mesozoic-plate-tectonic-reconstruction-of-the-carpathian-region-1j51wCeO0S
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0031-0182
eISSN
1872-616X
DOI
10.1016/j.palaeo.2004.02.033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Palaeomagnetic, palaeobiogeographic and structural comparisons of different parts of the Alpine–Carpathian region suggest that four terranes comprise this area: the Alcapa, Tisza, Dacia and Adria terranes. These terranes are composed of different Mesozoic continental and oceanic fragments that were each assembled during a complex Late Jurassic–Cretaceous–Palaeogene history. Palaeomagnetic and tectonic data suggest that the Carpathians are built up by two major oroclinal bends. The Alcapa bend has the Meliata oceanic unit, correlated with the Dinaric Vardar ophiolite, in its core. It is composed of the Western Carpathians, Eastern Alps and Southern Alcapa units (Transdanubian Range, Bükk). This terrane finds its continuation in the High Karst margin of the Dinarides. Further elements of the Alcapa terrane are thought to be derived from collided microcontinents: Czorsztyn in the N and a carbonate unit (Tisza?) in the SE. The Tisza–Dacia bend has the Vardar oceanic unit in its core. It is composed of the Bihor and Getic microcontinents. This terrane finds its continuation in the Serbo–Macedonian Massif of the Balkans. The Bihor–Getic microcontinent originally laid east of the Western Carpathians and filled the present Carpathian embayment in the Late Palaeozoic–Early Mesozoic. The Vardar ocean occupied an intermediate position between the Western Carpathian–Austroalpine–Transdanubian–High Karst margin and the Bihor–Getic–Serbo–Macedonian microcontinent. The Vardar and Pindos oceans were opened in the heart of the Mediterranean–Adriatic microcontinent in the Late Permian–Middle Triassic. Vardar subducted by the end of Jurassic, causing the Bihor–Getic–Serbo–Macedonian microcontinent to collide with the internal Dinaric–Western Carpathian margin. An external Penninic–Váhic ocean tract began opening in the Early Jurassic, separating the Austroalpine–Western Carpathian microcontinent (and its fauna) from the European shelf. Further east, the Severin–Ceahlau–Magura also began opening in the Early Jurassic, but final separation of the Bihor–Getic ribbon (and its fauna) from the European shelf did not take place until the late Middle Jurassic. The Alcapa and the Tisza–Dacia were bending during the Albian–Maastrichtian. The two oroclinal bends were finally opposed and pushed into the gates of the Carpathian embayment during the Palaeogene and Neogene. At that time, the main N–S shortening in distant Alpine and Hellenic sectors was linked by a broader right-lateral shear zone along the former Vardar suture.

Journal

"Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology"Elsevier

Published: Jul 23, 2004

References

  • Upper cretaceous magmatic series and associated mineralisation in the Carpathian–Balkan orogen
    Berza, T; Constantinescu, E; Vlad, S.N
  • The Mid-Hungarian line: a zone of repeated tectonic inversions
    Csontos, L; Nagymarosy, A
  • Exhumation of the Rechnitz Window at the border of Eastern Alps and Pannonian basin during Neogene extension
    Dunkl, I; Demény, A
  • Miocene–Pliocene evolution of the Slovenian Periadriatic fault: implications for Alpine Carpathian extrusion models
    Fodor, L; Jelen, B; Márton, E; Skaberne, D; Car, J; Vrabec, M
  • Late Cretaceous synorogenic low angle normal faulting along the Schlinig fault (Switzerland, Italy, Austria) and its significance for the tectonics of the Eastern Alps
    Froitzheim, N; Conti, P; van Daalen, M
  • Significance of Late Permian–Triassic facies zones in terrane reconstructions in the Alpine–North Pannonian domain
    Haas, J; Kovács, S; Krystyn, L; Lein, R
  • Transpressional collision structures in the upper crust: the fold and thrust belt of the Northern Calcareous Alps
    Linzer, H-G; Ratschbacher, L; Frisch, W
  • Evolution of Pangea: paleomagnetic constraints from the Southern Alps, Italy
    Muttoni, G; Kent, D.V; Channell, J.E.T
  • Late Cretaceous exhumation of the metamorphic Gleinalm dome, Eastern Alps: kinematics, cooling history and sedimentary response in a sinistral wrench corridor
    Neubauer, F; Dallmeyer, R.D; Dunkl, I; Schrenk, D
  • Tectonic activity in the Croatian part of the Pannonian Basin
    Prelogović, E; Saftić, B; Kuk, V; Velić, J; Dragaš, M; Lučić, D
  • Lateral extrusion in the Eastern Alps: Part 2. Structural analysis
    Ratschbacher, L; Frisch, W; Linzer, H.G; Merle, O
  • Cretaceous to Miocene thrusting and wrenching along the Central South Carpathians due to a corner effect during collision and orocline formation
    Ratschbacher, L; Linzer, H.-G; Moser, F; Strusievicz, R.-O; Bedelean, H; Har, N; Mogoş, P.-A
  • Pre-Neogene evolution of the Western Carpathians: constraints from the Bochnia–Tatra Mountains section (Polish Western Carpathians)
    Roca, E; Bessereau, G; Jawor, E; Kotarba, M; Roure, F
  • Tomographic images of the upper mantle below central Europe and the Mediterranean
    Spakman, W
  • Interplay between subduction retreat and lateral extrusion: tectonics of the Western Carpathians
    Sperner, B; Ratschbacher, L; Nemčok, M
  • A plate-tectonic model for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic constrained by dynamic plate boundaries and restored synthetic oceanic isochrons
    Stampfli, G; Borel, G
  • Subduction and obduction process in the Swiss Alps
    Stampfli, G.M; Mosar, J; Borel, G; Marquer, D; Marchart, R; Baudin, T
  • Geodynamic evolution of the northern Dinarides and southern part of the Pannonian Basin
    Tari, V; Pamić, J
  • Paleomagnetic results from Saudi Arabia and the Permo-Triassic Pangea configuration
    Torcq, F; Besse, J; Vaslet, D; Marcoux, J; Ricou, L; Halawani, M; Basahel, M
  • Structural evolution of an antiformal window: the Scheiblingkirchen Window (Eastern Alps, Austria)
    Willingshofer, E; Neubauer, F

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off