Mediating perceived parenting styles–test anxiety relationships: Academic procrastination and maladaptive perfectionism

Mediating perceived parenting styles–test anxiety relationships: Academic procrastination and... 1 Introduction</h5> Researchers have established a positive relationship between controlling parenting styles and child anxiety ( McLeod, Wood, & Weisz, 2007; Niditch & Varela, 2012 ). Investigating the correlates of academic anxiety in particular, Putwain, Woods, and Symes (2010) found a positive association between parental pressure and test anxiety in high-school students, and Greenberger, Lessard, Chen, and Farruggia (2008) found an inverse relationship between parental warmth and achievement anxiety among college students. Together, the preceding research demonstrated a link between perceived parenting practices and anxiety in childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Researchers have also identified a positive association between academic procrastination and test anxiety ( Onwuegbuzie, 2004; Rothblum, Solomon, & Murakami, 1986 ) as well as a positive relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and test anxiety among undergraduates ( Eum & Rice, 2011; Stöeber, Feast, & Hayward, 2009 ). Examining the debilitating effects of both procrastination and perfectionism, Rice, Richardson, and Clark (2012) found that they predicted psychological distress in college students. Thus far, researchers have not examined academic procrastination and maladaptive perfectionism in relation to either parenting styles or test anxiety. Addressing this gap in the literature, we examined academic procrastination and maladaptive perfectionism as concurrent mediators of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Learning and Individual Differences Elsevier

Mediating perceived parenting styles–test anxiety relationships: Academic procrastination and maladaptive perfectionism

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/elsevier/mediating-perceived-parenting-styles-test-anxiety-relationships-tbntn8QWXg
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1041-6080
eISSN
1873-3425
DOI
10.1016/j.lindif.2014.05.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Researchers have established a positive relationship between controlling parenting styles and child anxiety ( McLeod, Wood, & Weisz, 2007; Niditch & Varela, 2012 ). Investigating the correlates of academic anxiety in particular, Putwain, Woods, and Symes (2010) found a positive association between parental pressure and test anxiety in high-school students, and Greenberger, Lessard, Chen, and Farruggia (2008) found an inverse relationship between parental warmth and achievement anxiety among college students. Together, the preceding research demonstrated a link between perceived parenting practices and anxiety in childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Researchers have also identified a positive association between academic procrastination and test anxiety ( Onwuegbuzie, 2004; Rothblum, Solomon, & Murakami, 1986 ) as well as a positive relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and test anxiety among undergraduates ( Eum & Rice, 2011; Stöeber, Feast, & Hayward, 2009 ). Examining the debilitating effects of both procrastination and perfectionism, Rice, Richardson, and Clark (2012) found that they predicted psychological distress in college students. Thus far, researchers have not examined academic procrastination and maladaptive perfectionism in relation to either parenting styles or test anxiety. Addressing this gap in the literature, we examined academic procrastination and maladaptive perfectionism as concurrent mediators of

Journal

Learning and Individual DifferencesElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off