Measuring Embodied Blue Water in American Diets: An EIO Supply Chain Approach

Measuring Embodied Blue Water in American Diets: An EIO Supply Chain Approach Food systems worldwide rely on water resources that are facing demand from a growing population while regional water supplies are increasingly uncertain due to climate change. In this environment, dietary changes may have the potential to reduce water used in food production. At the same time, it is well established that American diets need to change in order to align with Federal healthy eating guidelines. In this article, we examine if there are synergies between healthier diets and blue water conservation in the U.S. food system. We estimate blue water use by supply chain stage using a multi-regional environmental input-output model. Then, we link this blue water to individual food items and use mathematical optimization to model healthy diet scenarios that meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We find that while healthier U.S. diet outcomes and blue water conservation can be synergistic, these goals may also be competing. Making minimal changes from current American consumption to a healthy omnivore or vegetarian diet, blue water use increases by 16%, but the omnivore and vegetarian diets reduce embodied blue water by 63 and 66%, respectively, when the objective is to minimize water use. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Economics Elsevier

Measuring Embodied Blue Water in American Diets: An EIO Supply Chain Approach

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/measuring-embodied-blue-water-in-american-diets-an-eio-supply-chain-TRJwLXSmQU
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0921-8009
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.12.028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Food systems worldwide rely on water resources that are facing demand from a growing population while regional water supplies are increasingly uncertain due to climate change. In this environment, dietary changes may have the potential to reduce water used in food production. At the same time, it is well established that American diets need to change in order to align with Federal healthy eating guidelines. In this article, we examine if there are synergies between healthier diets and blue water conservation in the U.S. food system. We estimate blue water use by supply chain stage using a multi-regional environmental input-output model. Then, we link this blue water to individual food items and use mathematical optimization to model healthy diet scenarios that meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. We find that while healthier U.S. diet outcomes and blue water conservation can be synergistic, these goals may also be competing. Making minimal changes from current American consumption to a healthy omnivore or vegetarian diet, blue water use increases by 16%, but the omnivore and vegetarian diets reduce embodied blue water by 63 and 66%, respectively, when the objective is to minimize water use.

Journal

Ecological EconomicsElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off