Manipulating the symbolic meaning of meat to encourage greater acceptance of fruits and vegetables and less proclivity for red and white meat

Manipulating the symbolic meaning of meat to encourage greater acceptance of fruits and... The present study tested the extent to which dietary preferences are altered by making aspects of the symbolic meaning of meat salient to participants. Individuals in the treatment group were informed of a previous scientific study which found that people who endorse social hierarchy and human dominance over nature consume more red and white meat, and that people who reject hierarchy and dominance eat more fruits and vegetables. The results showed that, compared to a control group, individuals in the treatment group who reject hierarchy and dominance (most participants) perceived red and white meat less favourably, decreased their liking of red and white meat, decreased their object identification with red and white meat, anticipated that they would eat more fruits and vegetables in the subsequent three days, and indeed consumed more fruits and vegetables in a follow-up study three weeks later. Moreover, the salience manipulation's ability to induce a negative response toward red and white meat and greater acceptance of fruits and vegetables was strongest for individuals in the treatment group for whom the salience manipulation made sense, individuals with less confidence in their diet choices, those who had previously considered reducing their meat consumption, and low/normal weight persons. These findings have implications for health promotion and for theories of food choice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

Manipulating the symbolic meaning of meat to encourage greater acceptance of fruits and vegetables and less proclivity for red and white meat

Appetite, Volume 38 (2) – Apr 1, 2002

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
DOI
10.1006/appe.2001.0474
pmid
12027371
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study tested the extent to which dietary preferences are altered by making aspects of the symbolic meaning of meat salient to participants. Individuals in the treatment group were informed of a previous scientific study which found that people who endorse social hierarchy and human dominance over nature consume more red and white meat, and that people who reject hierarchy and dominance eat more fruits and vegetables. The results showed that, compared to a control group, individuals in the treatment group who reject hierarchy and dominance (most participants) perceived red and white meat less favourably, decreased their liking of red and white meat, decreased their object identification with red and white meat, anticipated that they would eat more fruits and vegetables in the subsequent three days, and indeed consumed more fruits and vegetables in a follow-up study three weeks later. Moreover, the salience manipulation's ability to induce a negative response toward red and white meat and greater acceptance of fruits and vegetables was strongest for individuals in the treatment group for whom the salience manipulation made sense, individuals with less confidence in their diet choices, those who had previously considered reducing their meat consumption, and low/normal weight persons. These findings have implications for health promotion and for theories of food choice.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2002

References

  • A practical method for uncovering the direct and indirect relationships between human values and consumer purchases
    Allen, M.W.
  • Food choice: a conceptual model of the process
    Furst, T.; Connors, M.; Bisogni, C.; Sobal J; Falk, L.
  • Servers and providers: the distribution of food within the family
    Kerr, M.; Charles, N.
  • Psychological mechanisms in the human use of animals
    Plous, S.
  • Nutritional knowledge and food intake
    Wardle, J.; Parmenter, K.; Waller, J.
  • Teenage vegetarianism: prevalence, social and cognitive contexts
    Worsley, A.; Skrzypiec, G.

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