Manganese accumulates in the brain of northern quolls (Dasyurus hallucatus) living near an active mine

Manganese accumulates in the brain of northern quolls (Dasyurus hallucatus) living near an active... Mining is fundamental to the Australian economy, yet little is known about how potential contaminants bioaccumulate and affect wildlife living near active mining sites. Here, we show using air sampling that fine manganese dust within the respirable size range is found at levels exceeding international recommendations even 20 km from manganese extraction, processing, and storage facilities on Groote Eylandt, Northern Territory. Endangered northern quolls (Dasyurus hallucatus) living near mining sites were found to have elevated manganese concentrations within their hair, testes, and in two brain regions—the neocortex and cerebellum, which are responsible for sensory perception and motor function, respectively. Accumulation in these organs has been associated with adverse reproductive and neurological effects in other species and could affect the long-term population viability of northern quolls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Manganese accumulates in the brain of northern quolls (Dasyurus hallucatus) living near an active mine

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.10.088
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mining is fundamental to the Australian economy, yet little is known about how potential contaminants bioaccumulate and affect wildlife living near active mining sites. Here, we show using air sampling that fine manganese dust within the respirable size range is found at levels exceeding international recommendations even 20 km from manganese extraction, processing, and storage facilities on Groote Eylandt, Northern Territory. Endangered northern quolls (Dasyurus hallucatus) living near mining sites were found to have elevated manganese concentrations within their hair, testes, and in two brain regions—the neocortex and cerebellum, which are responsible for sensory perception and motor function, respectively. Accumulation in these organs has been associated with adverse reproductive and neurological effects in other species and could affect the long-term population viability of northern quolls.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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