Lubrication of rolling element bearings with HFC–polyolester mixtures

Lubrication of rolling element bearings with HFC–polyolester mixtures Manufacturers of refrigeration and air-conditioning compressors have had to re-evaluate their knowledge of compressor bearing lubrication following the introduction of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants and polyolester lubricants. The lack of anti wear protection in comparison to traditionally used refrigerants/lubricants makes the lubrication of bearings using these modern systems a much more difficult task than before. This paper presents results from ongoing research activities to develop methods and generate data that can be used to support engineers and chemists designing compressors and lubricants. Viscosity and pressure–viscosity data for three ISO VG 32 polyolester lubricants and also a film forming comparison between two ISO VG 68 polyolester lubricants are presented. This data shows that a high degree of branching has a negative effect on the performance of the lubricant in certain applications. Whilst a branched lubricant offers the benefit of a higher-pressure–viscosity coefficient under normal conditions, the reduction in viscosity and pressure–viscosity coefficient when diluted by refrigerant is far greater than for normal/linear lubricants. This characteristic results in a poorer film forming ability in applications where the lubricant is subjected to refrigerant gas with a low superheat. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Lubrication of rolling element bearings with HFC–polyolester mixtures

Wear, Volume 232 (2) – Oct 1, 1999

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science S.A.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0043-1648(99)00144-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Manufacturers of refrigeration and air-conditioning compressors have had to re-evaluate their knowledge of compressor bearing lubrication following the introduction of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants and polyolester lubricants. The lack of anti wear protection in comparison to traditionally used refrigerants/lubricants makes the lubrication of bearings using these modern systems a much more difficult task than before. This paper presents results from ongoing research activities to develop methods and generate data that can be used to support engineers and chemists designing compressors and lubricants. Viscosity and pressure–viscosity data for three ISO VG 32 polyolester lubricants and also a film forming comparison between two ISO VG 68 polyolester lubricants are presented. This data shows that a high degree of branching has a negative effect on the performance of the lubricant in certain applications. Whilst a branched lubricant offers the benefit of a higher-pressure–viscosity coefficient under normal conditions, the reduction in viscosity and pressure–viscosity coefficient when diluted by refrigerant is far greater than for normal/linear lubricants. This characteristic results in a poorer film forming ability in applications where the lubricant is subjected to refrigerant gas with a low superheat.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1999

References

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