Love and loathing of the city: Urbanophilia and urbanophobia, topological identity and perceived incivilities

Love and loathing of the city: Urbanophilia and urbanophobia, topological identity and perceived... This article examines how overall adherence to an ideology favourable or unfavourable to the city affects the practical ways in which one identifies with the city in which one lives. We then proceed to explore how these influence the perception of negative environmental stimuli, which we depict in our study as “incivilities”. The interrelations between three principal variables are examined: (1) the degree of attraction towards or rejection of the city (“urbanophilia” vs. “urbanophobia”), based on how people view the Ideal City; (2) topological identity (strong vs. weak); and (3) perception of the salience of incivilities (also strong vs. weak). Our results indicate that possessing an “urbanophile” attitude corresponds to a strong topological identity and a tendency to underestimate the frequency of uncivil behaviours. “Urbanophobia”, on the other hand, is clearly correlated with a weak urban identity and a tendency to overestimate uncivil behaviour in the city. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Psychology Elsevier

Love and loathing of the city: Urbanophilia and urbanophobia, topological identity and perceived incivilities

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0272-4944
eISSN
1522-9610
DOI
10.1016/S0272-4944(03)00049-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines how overall adherence to an ideology favourable or unfavourable to the city affects the practical ways in which one identifies with the city in which one lives. We then proceed to explore how these influence the perception of negative environmental stimuli, which we depict in our study as “incivilities”. The interrelations between three principal variables are examined: (1) the degree of attraction towards or rejection of the city (“urbanophilia” vs. “urbanophobia”), based on how people view the Ideal City; (2) topological identity (strong vs. weak); and (3) perception of the salience of incivilities (also strong vs. weak). Our results indicate that possessing an “urbanophile” attitude corresponds to a strong topological identity and a tendency to underestimate the frequency of uncivil behaviours. “Urbanophobia”, on the other hand, is clearly correlated with a weak urban identity and a tendency to overestimate uncivil behaviour in the city.

Journal

Journal of Environmental PsychologyElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2004

References

  • Residential attachment
    Fried, M.

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