Lost in translation: taking neuroprotection from animal models to clinical trials

Lost in translation: taking neuroprotection from animal models to clinical trials Caffeinol has been proposed as a neuroprotectant for human trials. This review covers a variety of animal models used and various attempts to take animal protocols to human trials. The accompanying paper discusses the rabbit model that was used to identify the efficacy of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. To date, this is the only model that was able to achieve laboratory to clinical translational success. Use of caffeinol as a cytoprotective agent in rat models yielded exciting results, which led to clinical trials. However, caffeinol given with tPA in rabbits leads to increased hemorrhage. Caffeinol alone does not prove to be neuroprotective, as vasodilation by itself is not efficacious. However, vasodilation combined with thrombolysis (caffeinol with tPA) poses an increased risk of hemorrhage. For a more translational approach to study neuroprotection and neuroprotective agents in human trials, it is necessary to demonstrate the efficacy of the procedure and purported agents in several animal models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Neurology Elsevier

Lost in translation: taking neuroprotection from animal models to clinical trials

Experimental Neurology, Volume 188 (2) – Aug 1, 2004

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0014-4886
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.expneurol.2004.05.008
Publisher site
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Abstract

Caffeinol has been proposed as a neuroprotectant for human trials. This review covers a variety of animal models used and various attempts to take animal protocols to human trials. The accompanying paper discusses the rabbit model that was used to identify the efficacy of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. To date, this is the only model that was able to achieve laboratory to clinical translational success. Use of caffeinol as a cytoprotective agent in rat models yielded exciting results, which led to clinical trials. However, caffeinol given with tPA in rabbits leads to increased hemorrhage. Caffeinol alone does not prove to be neuroprotective, as vasodilation by itself is not efficacious. However, vasodilation combined with thrombolysis (caffeinol with tPA) poses an increased risk of hemorrhage. For a more translational approach to study neuroprotection and neuroprotective agents in human trials, it is necessary to demonstrate the efficacy of the procedure and purported agents in several animal models.

Journal

Experimental NeurologyElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2004

References

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