Localization of NADPH-diaphorase/nitric oxide synthase in the rat retina: an electron microscopic study

Localization of NADPH-diaphorase/nitric oxide synthase in the rat retina: an electron microscopic... The activity of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was examined histochemically in the rat and mice retina. Mice in which the neuronal NOS gene has been disrupted (nNOS − mice) were used for specificity controls. Light microscopically a few amacrine cells were heavily stained. Other cells were stained weakly or not at all. Under the electron microscope, formazan precipitates were detectable on membranes of endoplasmic reticulum, nuclear envelope, mitochondria, and, in a few cases, the Golgi complex. Bipolar, horizontal, and Mu¨ller cells, were if at all, sparsely labeled with formazan. Labeled mitochondria were observed in rod endings and in inner segments of photoreceptors. Outer segments of photoreceptors and ganglion cells were completely free of reaction product. The NADPH-d reaction in wild-type mice displayed a similar distribution pattern to that in rats. Retinaee of nNOS − mice showed a complete lack of prominent NADPH-d stained (amacrine) cells. Non or a very few labeled membranes were seen. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Elsevier

Localization of NADPH-diaphorase/nitric oxide synthase in the rat retina: an electron microscopic study

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved
ISSN
0006-8993
D.O.I.
10.1016/0006-8993(95)00559-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The activity of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was examined histochemically in the rat and mice retina. Mice in which the neuronal NOS gene has been disrupted (nNOS − mice) were used for specificity controls. Light microscopically a few amacrine cells were heavily stained. Other cells were stained weakly or not at all. Under the electron microscope, formazan precipitates were detectable on membranes of endoplasmic reticulum, nuclear envelope, mitochondria, and, in a few cases, the Golgi complex. Bipolar, horizontal, and Mu¨ller cells, were if at all, sparsely labeled with formazan. Labeled mitochondria were observed in rod endings and in inner segments of photoreceptors. Outer segments of photoreceptors and ganglion cells were completely free of reaction product. The NADPH-d reaction in wild-type mice displayed a similar distribution pattern to that in rats. Retinaee of nNOS − mice showed a complete lack of prominent NADPH-d stained (amacrine) cells. Non or a very few labeled membranes were seen.

Journal

Brain ResearchElsevier

Published: Sep 4, 1995

References

  • Nitric oxide, a novel neuronal messenger
    Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H.

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