Limb Initiation and Development Is Normal in the Absence of the Mesonephros

Limb Initiation and Development Is Normal in the Absence of the Mesonephros With rapid progress in understanding the genes that control limb development and patterning interest is becoming focused on the factors that permit the emergence of the limb bud. The current hypothesis is that FGF-8 from the mesonephros induces limb initiation. To test this, the inductive interaction between the Wolffian duct and intermediate mesoderm was blocked rostral to the limb field, preventing mesonephric differentiation while maintaining the integrity of the limb field. The experimental outcome was monitored by following expression of cSim1 and Lmx1, molecular markers for the duct and the mesonephros, respectively. Evidence is presented that the intermediate mesoderm undergoes apoptosis when the inductive interaction with the Wolffian duct is blocked. fgf-8 expression was undetectable in the mesonephric area of embryos with confirmed absence of mesonephros; nevertheless, limb buds formed and limb development was normal. The mesonephros in general, and specifically its fgf-8 expression, was shown to be unnecessary for limb initiation and development; the hypothesis linking the mesonephros and limb development is not supported. Further studies of axial influences on limb initiation should now concentrate on medial structures such as Hensen's node and paraxial mesoderm; the alternative that no axial influences are required should also be examined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Biology Elsevier

Limb Initiation and Development Is Normal in the Absence of the Mesonephros

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Academic Press
ISSN
0012-1606
eISSN
1095-564X
DOI
10.1006/dbio.1997.8680
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With rapid progress in understanding the genes that control limb development and patterning interest is becoming focused on the factors that permit the emergence of the limb bud. The current hypothesis is that FGF-8 from the mesonephros induces limb initiation. To test this, the inductive interaction between the Wolffian duct and intermediate mesoderm was blocked rostral to the limb field, preventing mesonephric differentiation while maintaining the integrity of the limb field. The experimental outcome was monitored by following expression of cSim1 and Lmx1, molecular markers for the duct and the mesonephros, respectively. Evidence is presented that the intermediate mesoderm undergoes apoptosis when the inductive interaction with the Wolffian duct is blocked. fgf-8 expression was undetectable in the mesonephric area of embryos with confirmed absence of mesonephros; nevertheless, limb buds formed and limb development was normal. The mesonephros in general, and specifically its fgf-8 expression, was shown to be unnecessary for limb initiation and development; the hypothesis linking the mesonephros and limb development is not supported. Further studies of axial influences on limb initiation should now concentrate on medial structures such as Hensen's node and paraxial mesoderm; the alternative that no axial influences are required should also be examined.

Journal

Developmental BiologyElsevier

Published: Sep 15, 1997

References

  • Cellular contribution of the different regions of the somatopleure to the developing limb
    Geduspan, J.S.; Solursh, M.
  • A series of normal stages in the development of the chick embryos
    Hamburger, V.; Hamilton, H.
  • FGF can induce outgrowth of somatic mesoderm both inside and outside of limb-forming regions
    Mima, T.; Ohuchi, H.; Noji, S.; Mikawa, T.
  • Gene expression in the limbless
    Noramly, S.; Pisenti, J.; Abbott, U.; Morgan, B.
  • An additional limb can be induced from the flank of the chick embryo by FGF4
    Ohuchi, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Ohata, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Kuwana, T.; Minma, T.; Mikawa, T.; Nohno, T.; Noji, S.

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