Lignocellulosic biobutanol production: Gridlocks and potential remedies

Lignocellulosic biobutanol production: Gridlocks and potential remedies 1 Introduction</h5> The worldwide energy consumption is increasing and on the other hand, fossil fuels are limited and it is dubious as to how long they will suffice the needs of humankind. The escalating fossil fuel and oil prices and climate change due to greenhouse gases have increased the quest for an alternative fuel that would be economical [1] . Biofuels, which can be produced either chemically or biotechnologically from renewable biomass, are CO 2 neutral and sound to be a promising alternative.</P>First generation fuels like ethanol, biodiesel and renewable diesel, made from sugars, grains and seeds, are produced commercially in many countries but have led to food vs. fuel war. On the other hand, second generation biofuels, made from non-edible parts of lignocellulosic biomass (hereafter referred to as LCB), are still on the path of commercialization [2] . It is anticipated that these second-generation biofuels will yield better energy, economics and carbon performance than first generation biofuels and are expected to overcome the limitations of first generation biofuels [3] .</P>1-Butanol or n-butanol is a straight chain isomer ending in alcohol functional group. It is considered as superior biofuel as compared to ethanol due to easy blending with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews Elsevier

Lignocellulosic biobutanol production: Gridlocks and potential remedies

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1364-0321
DOI
10.1016/j.rser.2014.05.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The worldwide energy consumption is increasing and on the other hand, fossil fuels are limited and it is dubious as to how long they will suffice the needs of humankind. The escalating fossil fuel and oil prices and climate change due to greenhouse gases have increased the quest for an alternative fuel that would be economical [1] . Biofuels, which can be produced either chemically or biotechnologically from renewable biomass, are CO 2 neutral and sound to be a promising alternative.</P>First generation fuels like ethanol, biodiesel and renewable diesel, made from sugars, grains and seeds, are produced commercially in many countries but have led to food vs. fuel war. On the other hand, second generation biofuels, made from non-edible parts of lignocellulosic biomass (hereafter referred to as LCB), are still on the path of commercialization [2] . It is anticipated that these second-generation biofuels will yield better energy, economics and carbon performance than first generation biofuels and are expected to overcome the limitations of first generation biofuels [3] .</P>1-Butanol or n-butanol is a straight chain isomer ending in alcohol functional group. It is considered as superior biofuel as compared to ethanol due to easy blending with

Journal

Renewable and Sustainable Energy ReviewsElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2014

References

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