Life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of urban residential buildings in Guangzhou city

Life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of urban residential buildings in... Carbon emissions are derived mainly from the building, industrial, and transport sectors. Buildings are responsible for more than 40% of global energy use and for as much as 33% of global greenhouse gas emissions. By the end of 2016, 57.4% of the total population lived in urban areas in China, a dramatic increase from 26% in 1990. It is essential to study and analyze both energy consumption and carbon emissions of buildings. Taking Guangzhou city of China as an example, this study applied a hybrid life cycle assessment approach to quantify both the energy consumption and CO2 emissions throughout the life cycle of an urban residential building. The data was collected from the Guangzhou input–output (IO) table of 2012, Guangzhou Statistical Yearbook of 2013, China Electric Power Yearbook of 2013, and statistical data of the studied building. Results showed that the overall life cycle energy consumption and CO2 (eq.) emissions for the studied building, constructed in 2012, were approximately 72,591.98 GJ and 12,637.32 t, respectively. The largest CO2 (eq.) emission factor was oil and the smallest one was electricity. The CO2 emissions of steel, concrete, brick, and cement together accounted for 76.69% of the total emissions which are related to building materials in the preparation stage. This research not only promotes the construction of eco-cities or eco-communities, but also provides decision makers with comprehensive data on the energy consumption and environmental impacts of residential buildings. The findings are of considerable importance in terms of energy saving and emissions reductions for society as a whole. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cleaner Production Elsevier

Life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of urban residential buildings in Guangzhou city

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-6526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.05.124
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Carbon emissions are derived mainly from the building, industrial, and transport sectors. Buildings are responsible for more than 40% of global energy use and for as much as 33% of global greenhouse gas emissions. By the end of 2016, 57.4% of the total population lived in urban areas in China, a dramatic increase from 26% in 1990. It is essential to study and analyze both energy consumption and carbon emissions of buildings. Taking Guangzhou city of China as an example, this study applied a hybrid life cycle assessment approach to quantify both the energy consumption and CO2 emissions throughout the life cycle of an urban residential building. The data was collected from the Guangzhou input–output (IO) table of 2012, Guangzhou Statistical Yearbook of 2013, China Electric Power Yearbook of 2013, and statistical data of the studied building. Results showed that the overall life cycle energy consumption and CO2 (eq.) emissions for the studied building, constructed in 2012, were approximately 72,591.98 GJ and 12,637.32 t, respectively. The largest CO2 (eq.) emission factor was oil and the smallest one was electricity. The CO2 emissions of steel, concrete, brick, and cement together accounted for 76.69% of the total emissions which are related to building materials in the preparation stage. This research not only promotes the construction of eco-cities or eco-communities, but also provides decision makers with comprehensive data on the energy consumption and environmental impacts of residential buildings. The findings are of considerable importance in terms of energy saving and emissions reductions for society as a whole.

Journal

Journal of Cleaner ProductionElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2018

References

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