Lesions to terminals of noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurones do not inhibit opiate withdrawal behaviour in rats

Lesions to terminals of noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurones do not inhibit opiate withdrawal... The involvement of neurones of the locus coeruleus (LC) in expression of opiate withdrawal behaviour was tested in morphine-dependent rats using N -2-chloroethyl- N -ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4), a neurotoxin selective for noradrenergic terminals arising from LC. Lesions were validated by determination of cortical noradrenaline concentrations using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, inhibition of the post-decapitation hindpaw reflex and dopamine-β-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. Lesions did not inhibit the expression of any naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs. These results suggest no involvement of noradrenergic LC neurones in expression of the overt signs of opiate withdrawal, and raise the possibility that previous microinjection and electrolytic lesion studies were confounded by effects on nearby brain regions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuroscience Letters Elsevier

Lesions to terminals of noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurones do not inhibit opiate withdrawal behaviour in rats

Neuroscience Letters, Volume 186 (1) – Feb 15, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0304-3940
DOI
10.1016/0304-3940(95)11276-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The involvement of neurones of the locus coeruleus (LC) in expression of opiate withdrawal behaviour was tested in morphine-dependent rats using N -2-chloroethyl- N -ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4), a neurotoxin selective for noradrenergic terminals arising from LC. Lesions were validated by determination of cortical noradrenaline concentrations using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, inhibition of the post-decapitation hindpaw reflex and dopamine-β-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. Lesions did not inhibit the expression of any naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs. These results suggest no involvement of noradrenergic LC neurones in expression of the overt signs of opiate withdrawal, and raise the possibility that previous microinjection and electrolytic lesion studies were confounded by effects on nearby brain regions.

Journal

Neuroscience LettersElsevier

Published: Feb 15, 1995

References

  • Increased fos-like immunoreactivity in the periaqueductal gray of anaesthetised rats during opiate withdrawal
    Chieng, B.
  • Noradrenergic and behavioural effects of naloxone injected into the locus coeruleus of morphine-dependent rats and their control by clonidine
    Esposito, E.
  • Long-term effects of N -2-chloroethyl- N -ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride on noradrenergic neurones in the rat brain and heart
    Ross, S.B.

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