Land tenure and REDD+: The good, the bad and the ugly

Land tenure and REDD+: The good, the bad and the ugly 1 Introduction</h5> Clear and secure land tenure rights have been identified as one of the key elements for successful conditional payment schemes promoting forest conservation, including strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). REDD is a performance-based mechanism whereby funds will be used to compensate developing countries for the reduction of forest carbon emissions as compared to a national baseline; the ‘plus’ refers to the inclusion of carbon stock enhancement. It is likely to involve both funds and compliance markets.</P>REDD+ has been met with considerable controversy. On the one hand, serious attention to the drivers of deforestation requires challenging ‘business as usual’ interests that lead to forest conversion. Business as usual in forests refers to the constellation of interests that seek to perpetuate privileged commercial access to forest lands and resources and thus, often, promote forest conversion ( Sunderlin et al., in press ). Though some of these actors have been attracted to the potential economic benefits of REDD+, it is not surprising that others would resist the change. On the other hand, grassroots actors, such as indigenous and other rural communities and their allies, have raised objections as well, particularly in relation to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Environmental Change Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-3780
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.02.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Clear and secure land tenure rights have been identified as one of the key elements for successful conditional payment schemes promoting forest conservation, including strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). REDD is a performance-based mechanism whereby funds will be used to compensate developing countries for the reduction of forest carbon emissions as compared to a national baseline; the ‘plus’ refers to the inclusion of carbon stock enhancement. It is likely to involve both funds and compliance markets.</P>REDD+ has been met with considerable controversy. On the one hand, serious attention to the drivers of deforestation requires challenging ‘business as usual’ interests that lead to forest conversion. Business as usual in forests refers to the constellation of interests that seek to perpetuate privileged commercial access to forest lands and resources and thus, often, promote forest conversion ( Sunderlin et al., in press ). Though some of these actors have been attracted to the potential economic benefits of REDD+, it is not surprising that others would resist the change. On the other hand, grassroots actors, such as indigenous and other rural communities and their allies, have raised objections as well, particularly in relation to the

Journal

Global Environmental ChangeElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2013

References

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