Key blackening and stinking pollutants in Dongsha River of Beijing: Spatial distribution and source identification

Key blackening and stinking pollutants in Dongsha River of Beijing: Spatial distribution and... Elimination of black-stinking water contamination has been listed as an urgent task in the Water pollution prevention action plan promulgated by State Council of China. However, the key blackening and stinking pollutants and their sources are still unclear. In this study, water quality of a black-stinking urban river in Beijing, Dongsha River, was evaluated firstly; then the distribution of the blackening and stinking pollutants was investigated, and the key pollutants and their potential sources were identified; and finally, the health risk of those pollutants was assessed. The results showed that NH3N, total phosphorus, dissolved oxygen and chemical oxygen demand ranged from 1.3 to 5.3 mg/L, 0.7–3.0 mg/L, 1.0–3.2 mg/L and 29–104 mg/L, respectively. The value of TP-based trophic level index indicated that Dongsha River reached severe eutrophication level; the maximum value of chroma and odor level reached 32 and 4, respectively. The main dissolved organic compounds included aromatic protein II, soluble microbiological metabolites, fulvic acids and humic acids. The blackening pollutants Fe, Mn, Cu and S2− were extensively detected, with significantly spatial differences along the river. Dimethyl sulfide, β-ionone, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin were identified to be the stinking pollutants. Their concentrations covered wide ranges, and even the lowest concentration value was thousands of times higher than its olfactory threshold. Correlation analysis indicated that in the overlaying water S2− was the key blackening pollutant, while β-ionone and geosmin were the key stinking pollutants. Principal components analysis combining with the site survey revealed their potential sources. S2− was mainly associated with the decomposition of endogenous sulfur-containing organics; β-ionone might be generated by the endogenous β-carotene bio-conversion and the exogenous discharges, while geosmin might originate from the endogenous humus bio-conversion and anthropic wastes. Furthermore, multi-metals in the sediment posed health risks to children, while dimethyl sulfide had non-cancer health risk for adults and children. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Environmental Management Elsevier

Key blackening and stinking pollutants in Dongsha River of Beijing: Spatial distribution and source identification

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.05.088
Publisher site
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Abstract

Elimination of black-stinking water contamination has been listed as an urgent task in the Water pollution prevention action plan promulgated by State Council of China. However, the key blackening and stinking pollutants and their sources are still unclear. In this study, water quality of a black-stinking urban river in Beijing, Dongsha River, was evaluated firstly; then the distribution of the blackening and stinking pollutants was investigated, and the key pollutants and their potential sources were identified; and finally, the health risk of those pollutants was assessed. The results showed that NH3N, total phosphorus, dissolved oxygen and chemical oxygen demand ranged from 1.3 to 5.3 mg/L, 0.7–3.0 mg/L, 1.0–3.2 mg/L and 29–104 mg/L, respectively. The value of TP-based trophic level index indicated that Dongsha River reached severe eutrophication level; the maximum value of chroma and odor level reached 32 and 4, respectively. The main dissolved organic compounds included aromatic protein II, soluble microbiological metabolites, fulvic acids and humic acids. The blackening pollutants Fe, Mn, Cu and S2− were extensively detected, with significantly spatial differences along the river. Dimethyl sulfide, β-ionone, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin were identified to be the stinking pollutants. Their concentrations covered wide ranges, and even the lowest concentration value was thousands of times higher than its olfactory threshold. Correlation analysis indicated that in the overlaying water S2− was the key blackening pollutant, while β-ionone and geosmin were the key stinking pollutants. Principal components analysis combining with the site survey revealed their potential sources. S2− was mainly associated with the decomposition of endogenous sulfur-containing organics; β-ionone might be generated by the endogenous β-carotene bio-conversion and the exogenous discharges, while geosmin might originate from the endogenous humus bio-conversion and anthropic wastes. Furthermore, multi-metals in the sediment posed health risks to children, while dimethyl sulfide had non-cancer health risk for adults and children.

Journal

Journal of Environmental ManagementElsevier

Published: Sep 15, 2017

References

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