Isolation and Characterization of WNT8B, a Novel Human Wnt Gene That Maps to 10q24

Isolation and Characterization of WNT8B, a Novel Human Wnt Gene That Maps to 10q24 Wnt genes encode intercellular signalling molecules that play important roles in key processes of embryonic development such as mesoderm induction, specification of the embryonic axis, and patterning of the central nervous system, spinal cord, and limb. Multiple such genes are known to exist in each of several species that have been investigated, and they have been classified into various groups and subgroups on the basis of high sequence homology and common expression patterns. The vertebrate Wnt8 subfamily includes genes from Xenopus, zebrafish, and chicken, but, to date, no mammalian homologues have been described. We now report cloning and characterization of a novel human member of this family that we have termed WNT8B on the basis of the very high sequence similarity of the inferred protein to those encoded by the Xenopus and zebrafish Wnt8b genes. PCR typing of a human monochromosomal hybrid cell panel mapped the gene to chromosome 10, and FISH mapping provided a subchromosomal location at 10q24. Northern blotting and RT-PCR assays indicated that the WNT8B gene is expressed in several human tissues during fetal and adult stages. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Genomics Elsevier

Isolation and Characterization of WNT8B, a Novel Human Wnt Gene That Maps to 10q24

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/isolation-and-characterization-of-wnt8b-a-novel-human-wnt-gene-that-Sxyxc8Zefl
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Academic Press
ISSN
0888-7543
eISSN
1089-8646
DOI
10.1006/geno.1996.0374
pmid
8661156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wnt genes encode intercellular signalling molecules that play important roles in key processes of embryonic development such as mesoderm induction, specification of the embryonic axis, and patterning of the central nervous system, spinal cord, and limb. Multiple such genes are known to exist in each of several species that have been investigated, and they have been classified into various groups and subgroups on the basis of high sequence homology and common expression patterns. The vertebrate Wnt8 subfamily includes genes from Xenopus, zebrafish, and chicken, but, to date, no mammalian homologues have been described. We now report cloning and characterization of a novel human member of this family that we have termed WNT8B on the basis of the very high sequence similarity of the inferred protein to those encoded by the Xenopus and zebrafish Wnt8b genes. PCR typing of a human monochromosomal hybrid cell panel mapped the gene to chromosome 10, and FISH mapping provided a subchromosomal location at 10q24. Northern blotting and RT-PCR assays indicated that the WNT8B gene is expressed in several human tissues during fetal and adult stages.

Journal

GenomicsElsevier

Published: Jul 15, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off