Investigating healthcare professionals’ decisions to accept telemedicine technology: an empirical test of competing theories

Investigating healthcare professionals’ decisions to accept telemedicine technology: an... The proliferation of information technology (IT) in supporting highly specialized tasks and services has made it increasingly important to understand the factors essential to technology acceptance by individuals. In a typical professional setting, the essential characteristics of user, technology, and context may differ considerably from those in ordinary business settings. This study examined physicians’ acceptance of telemedicine technology. Following a theory comparison approach, it evaluated the extent to which prevailing intention-based models, including the technology acceptance model (TAM), the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and an integrated model, could explain individual physicians’ technology acceptance decisions. Based on responses from more than 400 physicians, both models were evaluated in terms of overall fit, explanatory power, and their causal links. Overall, findings suggest that TAM may be more appropriate than TPB for examining technology acceptance by individual professionals and that the integrated model, although more fully depicting physicians’ technology acceptance, may not provide significant additional explanatory power. Also, instruments developed and repeatedly tested in prior studies involving conventional end-users and business managers may not be valid in professional settings. Several interesting implications are also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information & Management Elsevier

Investigating healthcare professionals’ decisions to accept telemedicine technology: an empirical test of competing theories

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0378-7206
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0378-7206(01)00098-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The proliferation of information technology (IT) in supporting highly specialized tasks and services has made it increasingly important to understand the factors essential to technology acceptance by individuals. In a typical professional setting, the essential characteristics of user, technology, and context may differ considerably from those in ordinary business settings. This study examined physicians’ acceptance of telemedicine technology. Following a theory comparison approach, it evaluated the extent to which prevailing intention-based models, including the technology acceptance model (TAM), the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and an integrated model, could explain individual physicians’ technology acceptance decisions. Based on responses from more than 400 physicians, both models were evaluated in terms of overall fit, explanatory power, and their causal links. Overall, findings suggest that TAM may be more appropriate than TPB for examining technology acceptance by individual professionals and that the integrated model, although more fully depicting physicians’ technology acceptance, may not provide significant additional explanatory power. Also, instruments developed and repeatedly tested in prior studies involving conventional end-users and business managers may not be valid in professional settings. Several interesting implications are also discussed.

Journal

Information & ManagementElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2002

References

  • An empirical investigation on factors affecting the acceptance of CASE by systems developers
    Chau, P.Y.K.
  • Reexamining a model for evaluating information center success using a structural equation modeling approach
    Chau, P.Y.K.
  • Usefulness and ease of use: field study evidence regarding task considerations
    Keil, M.; Beranek, P.M.; Konsynski, B.R.
  • Lessons learned from three interorganizational health care information systems
    Payton, F.C.
  • Health care information systems
    Raghupathi, W.

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