Invertebrate communities in boreal forest canopies as influenced by forestry and lichens with implications for passerine birds

Invertebrate communities in boreal forest canopies as influenced by forestry and lichens with... To investigate the effects of commercial forestry on canopy-living invertebrates in the boreal forest, we sampled branches in northern Sweden for invertebrates and lichens from paired natural spruce Picea abies forests and adjacent managed forests that were selectively logged. The study was conducted during late winter, when invertebrate abundance is lowest, and when small differences may be critical to foraging birds. Natural forests had significantly greater invertebrate diversity than managed forests and nearly five times as many invertebrates per branch. The number of large invertebrates (> 2·5 mm, the minimum prey size for foraging passerine birds) was consistently higher in natural forests, with spiders (Araneae), Lepidoptera and Diptera larvae dominating. The number and biomass of invertebrates were related to the abundance of lichens even after controlling for sampling location and branch size. Other studies have implicated forestry in the decline of non-migratory passerine birds in northern Europe through the destruction and fragmentation of forests, but our study indicates that it may also reduce foraging habitat quality through a reduction in lichen abundance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Invertebrate communities in boreal forest canopies as influenced by forestry and lichens with implications for passerine birds

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/0006-3207(95)00015-V
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To investigate the effects of commercial forestry on canopy-living invertebrates in the boreal forest, we sampled branches in northern Sweden for invertebrates and lichens from paired natural spruce Picea abies forests and adjacent managed forests that were selectively logged. The study was conducted during late winter, when invertebrate abundance is lowest, and when small differences may be critical to foraging birds. Natural forests had significantly greater invertebrate diversity than managed forests and nearly five times as many invertebrates per branch. The number of large invertebrates (> 2·5 mm, the minimum prey size for foraging passerine birds) was consistently higher in natural forests, with spiders (Araneae), Lepidoptera and Diptera larvae dominating. The number and biomass of invertebrates were related to the abundance of lichens even after controlling for sampling location and branch size. Other studies have implicated forestry in the decline of non-migratory passerine birds in northern Europe through the destruction and fragmentation of forests, but our study indicates that it may also reduce foraging habitat quality through a reduction in lichen abundance.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • Winter decline of spiders and insects in spruce Picea abies and its relation to predation by birds
    Jansson, C.; von Brömssen, A.
  • The impact of forest cutting on the diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in the southern Appalachians
    Lenski, R.E.
  • Effects of clear-cut harvesting on boreal ground-beetle assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in western Canada
    Niemelä, J.; Langor, D.; Spence, J.R.

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