Introduction: modularity in plant models

Introduction: modularity in plant models |UItlI ELSEVIER Ecological Modelling94 (1997) I-6 Ill Basil A c o c k ~,*, J a m e s F. R e y n o l d s b ~USDA, ARS, Remote Sensing and Modeling Laboratory, Building 007, Room 008, BARC-W, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2350, USA bDepartment of Botany, Phytotron Building, Box 90340, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0340, USA The development of computer software is an inherently complex process (Booch, 1991; Brooks, 1987). The complexity varies with the design objective and the desired flexibility of the endproduct. Computer professionals have developed numerous design methods to aid in this development process, including top-down structured design, data-driven design, and object-oriented design (Sommerville, 1985). The central task in all these methods is decomposing the problem into simpler subproblems, or modules, that can be solved in isolation from each other. The major difference between Sommerville's three categories of software design is their concept of a module: each uses a different definition. Success in producing software ultimately depends on making good modules. An analogous exercise in software development is the large international modelling effort currently under way to examine the potential effects of elevated CO2 and climate change on native plants http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Modelling Elsevier

Introduction: modularity in plant models

Ecological Modelling, Volume 94 (1) – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0304-3800
eISSN
1872-7026
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0304-3800(96)01923-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

|UItlI ELSEVIER Ecological Modelling94 (1997) I-6 Ill Basil A c o c k ~,*, J a m e s F. R e y n o l d s b ~USDA, ARS, Remote Sensing and Modeling Laboratory, Building 007, Room 008, BARC-W, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2350, USA bDepartment of Botany, Phytotron Building, Box 90340, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0340, USA The development of computer software is an inherently complex process (Booch, 1991; Brooks, 1987). The complexity varies with the design objective and the desired flexibility of the endproduct. Computer professionals have developed numerous design methods to aid in this development process, including top-down structured design, data-driven design, and object-oriented design (Sommerville, 1985). The central task in all these methods is decomposing the problem into simpler subproblems, or modules, that can be solved in isolation from each other. The major difference between Sommerville's three categories of software design is their concept of a module: each uses a different definition. Success in producing software ultimately depends on making good modules. An analogous exercise in software development is the large international modelling effort currently under way to examine the potential effects of elevated CO2 and climate change on native plants

Journal

Ecological ModellingElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1997

References

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