Interface motion of capillary-driven flow in rectangular microchannel

Interface motion of capillary-driven flow in rectangular microchannel In microchannel flow, gas–liquid interface behavior is important for developing a wide range of microfluidic applications, especially in passive microfluidic systems. This paper presents a discussion of interface motion driven by capillary action in a microchannel. We have extended the theory beyond the previous theory of capillary rise problem for a circular tube, to a rectangular microchannel. The same formula for the relation between nondimensional time and interface position is obtained as for a circular tube. We examined rectangular microchannels with several sizes (about 50 to 100 μm square) of glass capillaries and 85 × 68 μm and 75 × 45 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels fabricated by photolithography technique, respectively. We observed movement of the gas–liquid interface position and compared it to the dimensionless relation. We obtained the value of a dimensionless variable of driving force that is related to dynamic contact angles for glass–water, glass–ethanol, and PDMS–ethanol. Using this variable, interface motion can be predicted for any size of rectangular channels. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Colloid and Interface Science Elsevier

Interface motion of capillary-driven flow in rectangular microchannel

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0021-9797
eISSN
1095-7103
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jcis.2004.07.017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In microchannel flow, gas–liquid interface behavior is important for developing a wide range of microfluidic applications, especially in passive microfluidic systems. This paper presents a discussion of interface motion driven by capillary action in a microchannel. We have extended the theory beyond the previous theory of capillary rise problem for a circular tube, to a rectangular microchannel. The same formula for the relation between nondimensional time and interface position is obtained as for a circular tube. We examined rectangular microchannels with several sizes (about 50 to 100 μm square) of glass capillaries and 85 × 68 μm and 75 × 45 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels fabricated by photolithography technique, respectively. We observed movement of the gas–liquid interface position and compared it to the dimensionless relation. We obtained the value of a dimensionless variable of driving force that is related to dynamic contact angles for glass–water, glass–ethanol, and PDMS–ethanol. Using this variable, interface motion can be predicted for any size of rectangular channels.

Journal

Journal of Colloid and Interface ScienceElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2004

References

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