Intercropping forage sorghum with maize is a promising alternative to maize silage for biogas production

Intercropping forage sorghum with maize is a promising alternative to maize silage for biogas... Maize (Zea mays L.) silage is the preferred feedstock choice for biogas production. However, other feedstocks or mixed feedstocks might have lower environmental impact than silage maize. The objectives of this study included: 1) to determine if forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and forage sorghum-maize intercropping can be a viable option to replace maize in forage and biogas production, and 2) to assess the environmental impact of systems involving maize and forage sorghum intercropping and comparing the impact of those, with conventional monocrop rotations. Replicated experiments were conducted in Carrington, Fargo, and Prosper, ND, in 2013 and in Fargo, ND in 2014. Maize for silage and grain and two forage sorghum cultivars (Brown Mid Rib (BMR) and non-BMR) were grown in monoculture and in intercropping. Treatments were a total of twelve; four monocultures, four inter-row intercropped maize-sorghum, and four within-row intercropped maize-sorghum. Results across environments indicated non-BMR forage sorghum monocultures produced similar or higher biomass yield compared with maize monocultures and maize-forage sorghum mixed cultures (inter-row and within-row). Biogas yield and forage quality produced by forage sorghum monocultures, and mixtures containing forage sorghum were similar to that of maize. Thus, forage sorghum can replace, at least in part, silage maize as feedstock for feed or biogas. Forage sorghum and forage sorghum-maize intercropping had lower environmental impact compared with maize in all categories evaluated. In conclusion, intercropping of forage sorghum with maize is a promising alternative to maize silage for forage or as feedstock for biogas production. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cleaner Production Elsevier

Intercropping forage sorghum with maize is a promising alternative to maize silage for biogas production

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/intercropping-forage-sorghum-with-maize-is-a-promising-alternative-to-F5jkecFC7z
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-6526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.05.083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maize (Zea mays L.) silage is the preferred feedstock choice for biogas production. However, other feedstocks or mixed feedstocks might have lower environmental impact than silage maize. The objectives of this study included: 1) to determine if forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and forage sorghum-maize intercropping can be a viable option to replace maize in forage and biogas production, and 2) to assess the environmental impact of systems involving maize and forage sorghum intercropping and comparing the impact of those, with conventional monocrop rotations. Replicated experiments were conducted in Carrington, Fargo, and Prosper, ND, in 2013 and in Fargo, ND in 2014. Maize for silage and grain and two forage sorghum cultivars (Brown Mid Rib (BMR) and non-BMR) were grown in monoculture and in intercropping. Treatments were a total of twelve; four monocultures, four inter-row intercropped maize-sorghum, and four within-row intercropped maize-sorghum. Results across environments indicated non-BMR forage sorghum monocultures produced similar or higher biomass yield compared with maize monocultures and maize-forage sorghum mixed cultures (inter-row and within-row). Biogas yield and forage quality produced by forage sorghum monocultures, and mixtures containing forage sorghum were similar to that of maize. Thus, forage sorghum can replace, at least in part, silage maize as feedstock for feed or biogas. Forage sorghum and forage sorghum-maize intercropping had lower environmental impact compared with maize in all categories evaluated. In conclusion, intercropping of forage sorghum with maize is a promising alternative to maize silage for forage or as feedstock for biogas production.

Journal

Journal of Cleaner ProductionElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off