Interannual variability in TES atmospheric observations of Mars during 1999–2003

Interannual variability in TES atmospheric observations of Mars during 1999–2003 We use infrared spectra returned by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) to retrieve atmospheric and surface temperature, dust and water ice aerosol optical depth, and water vapor column abundance. The data presented here span more than two martian years (Mars Year 24, L s =104°, 1 March 1999 to Mars Year 26, L s =180°, 4 May 2003). We present an overview of the seasonal ( L s ), latitudinal, and longitudinal dependence of atmospheric quantities during this period, as well as an initial assessment of the interannual variability in the current martian climate. We find that the perihelion season ( L s =180°–360°) is relatively warm, dusty, free of water ice clouds, and shows a relatively high degree of interannual variability in dust optical depth and atmospheric temperature. On the other hand, the aphelion season ( L s =0°–180°) is relatively cool, cloudy, free of dust, and shows a low degree of interannual variability. Water vapor abundance shows a moderate amount of interannual variability at all seasons, but the most in the perihelion season. Much of the small amount of interannual variability that is observed in the aphelion season appears to be caused by perihelion-season planet-encircling dust storms. These dust storms increase albedo through deposition of bright dust on the surface causing cooler daytime surface and atmospheric temperatures well after dust optical depth returns to prestorm values. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Icarus Elsevier

Interannual variability in TES atmospheric observations of Mars during 1999–2003

Icarus, Volume 167 (1) – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0019-1035
eISSN
1090-2643
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.icarus.2003.09.010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We use infrared spectra returned by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) to retrieve atmospheric and surface temperature, dust and water ice aerosol optical depth, and water vapor column abundance. The data presented here span more than two martian years (Mars Year 24, L s =104°, 1 March 1999 to Mars Year 26, L s =180°, 4 May 2003). We present an overview of the seasonal ( L s ), latitudinal, and longitudinal dependence of atmospheric quantities during this period, as well as an initial assessment of the interannual variability in the current martian climate. We find that the perihelion season ( L s =180°–360°) is relatively warm, dusty, free of water ice clouds, and shows a relatively high degree of interannual variability in dust optical depth and atmospheric temperature. On the other hand, the aphelion season ( L s =0°–180°) is relatively cool, cloudy, free of dust, and shows a low degree of interannual variability. Water vapor abundance shows a moderate amount of interannual variability at all seasons, but the most in the perihelion season. Much of the small amount of interannual variability that is observed in the aphelion season appears to be caused by perihelion-season planet-encircling dust storms. These dust storms increase albedo through deposition of bright dust on the surface causing cooler daytime surface and atmospheric temperatures well after dust optical depth returns to prestorm values.

Journal

IcarusElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2004

References

  • Multiple emission angle surface–atmosphere separations of Thermal Emission Spectrometer data
    Bandfield, J.L.; Smith, M.D.
  • Forced waves in the martian atmosphere from MGS TES nadir data
    Banfield, D.; Conrath, B.J.; Smith, M.D.; Christensen, P.R.; Wilson, R.J.
  • Traveling waves in the martian atmosphere from MGS TES nadir data
    Banfield, D.; Conrath, B.J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Smith, M.D.
  • Water vapor saturation at low altitudes around Mars aphelion: a key to Mars climate?
    Clancy, R.T.; Grossman, A.W.; Wolff, M.J.; James, P.B.; Billawalla, Y.N.; Sandor, B.J.; Lee, S.W.; Rudy, D.J.
  • Mapping Mariner 9 dust opacities
    Fenton, L.K.; Pearl, J.C.; Martin, T.Z.
  • One martian year of atmospheric observations by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer
    Smith, M.D.; Pearl, J.C.; Conrath, B.J.; Christensen, P.R.
  • Thermal Emission Spectrometer Observations of martian planet-encircling dust storm 2001a
    Smith, M.D.; Pearl, J.C.; Conrath, B.J.; Christensen, P.R.
  • Traveling waves in the northern hemisphere of Mars
    Wilson, R.J.; Banfield, D.; Conrath, B.J.; Smith, M.D.

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