Interaction between zinc and freshwater and marine diatom species: Surface complexation and Zn isotope fractionation

Interaction between zinc and freshwater and marine diatom species: Surface complexation and Zn... This work is devoted to characterization of zinc interaction in aqueous solution with two marine planktonic ( Thalassiosira weissflogii = TW, Skeletonema costatum = SC) and two freshwater periphytic species ( Achnanthidium minutissimum = AMIN, Navicula minima = NMIN) by combining adsorption and electrophoretic measurements with surface complexation modeling and by assessing Zn isotopes fractionation during both long term uptake and short term adsorption on diatom cells and their frustules. Reversible adsorption experiments were performed at 25 and 5 °C as a function of exposure time (5 min to 140 h), pH (2 to 10), zinc concentration in solution (10 nM to 1 mM), ionic strength ( I = 0.001 to 1.0 M) and the presence of light. While the shape of pH-dependent adsorption edge is almost the same for all four species, the constant-pH adsorption isotherm and maximal Zn binding capacities differ by an order of magnitude. The extent of adsorption increases with temperature from 5 to 25 °C and does not depend on light intensity. Zinc adsorption decreases with increase of ionic strength suggesting competition with sodium for surface sites. Cell number-normalized concentrations of sorbed zinc on whole cells and their silica frustules demonstrated only weak contribution of the latter (10–20%) to overall zinc binding by diatom cell wall. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities ( μ ) revealed negative diatoms surface potential in the full range of zinc concentrations investigated (0.15–760 μmol/L), however, the absolute value of μ decreases at (Zn) > 15 μmol/L suggesting a change in surface speciation. These observations allowed us to construct a surface complexation model for Zn binding by diatom surfaces that postulates the constant capacitance of the electric double layer and considers Zn complexation with carboxylate and silanol groups. Thermodynamic and structural parameters of this model are based on previous acid–base titration and spectroscopic results and allow quantitative reproduction of all adsorption experiments. Although Zn adsorption constants on carboxylate groups are almost the same, Zn surface adsorption capacities are very different among diatom species which is related to the systematic differences in their cell wall composition and thickness. Measurements of Zn isotopic composition ( 66 Zn/( 64 Zn)) performed using a multicollector ICP MS demonstrated that irreversible incorporation of Zn in cultured diatom cells produces enrichment in heavy isotope compared to growth media (Δ 66 Zn(solid–solution) = 0.27 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.05, 0.21 ± 0.05, and 0.19 ± 0.05‰ for TW, SC, NMIN, and AMIN species, respectively). Accordingly, an enrichment of cells in heavy isotopes (Δ 66 Zn(solid–solution) = 0.43 ± 0.1 and 0.27 ± 0.1‰ for NMIN and AMIN, respectively) is observed following short-term Zn sorption on freshwater cells in nutrient media at pH ∼ 7.8. Finally, diatoms frustules are enriched in heavy isotopes compared to solution during Zn adsorption on silica shells at pH ∼ 5.5 (Δ 66 Zn(solid–solution) = 0.35 ± 0.10‰). Measured isotopes fractionation can be related to the structure and stability of Zn complexes formed and they provide a firm basis for using Zn isotopes for biogeochemical tracing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta Elsevier

Interaction between zinc and freshwater and marine diatom species: Surface complexation and Zn isotope fractionation

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0016-7037
eISSN
1872-9533
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.gca.2005.10.026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This work is devoted to characterization of zinc interaction in aqueous solution with two marine planktonic ( Thalassiosira weissflogii = TW, Skeletonema costatum = SC) and two freshwater periphytic species ( Achnanthidium minutissimum = AMIN, Navicula minima = NMIN) by combining adsorption and electrophoretic measurements with surface complexation modeling and by assessing Zn isotopes fractionation during both long term uptake and short term adsorption on diatom cells and their frustules. Reversible adsorption experiments were performed at 25 and 5 °C as a function of exposure time (5 min to 140 h), pH (2 to 10), zinc concentration in solution (10 nM to 1 mM), ionic strength ( I = 0.001 to 1.0 M) and the presence of light. While the shape of pH-dependent adsorption edge is almost the same for all four species, the constant-pH adsorption isotherm and maximal Zn binding capacities differ by an order of magnitude. The extent of adsorption increases with temperature from 5 to 25 °C and does not depend on light intensity. Zinc adsorption decreases with increase of ionic strength suggesting competition with sodium for surface sites. Cell number-normalized concentrations of sorbed zinc on whole cells and their silica frustules demonstrated only weak contribution of the latter (10–20%) to overall zinc binding by diatom cell wall. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities ( μ ) revealed negative diatoms surface potential in the full range of zinc concentrations investigated (0.15–760 μmol/L), however, the absolute value of μ decreases at (Zn) > 15 μmol/L suggesting a change in surface speciation. These observations allowed us to construct a surface complexation model for Zn binding by diatom surfaces that postulates the constant capacitance of the electric double layer and considers Zn complexation with carboxylate and silanol groups. Thermodynamic and structural parameters of this model are based on previous acid–base titration and spectroscopic results and allow quantitative reproduction of all adsorption experiments. Although Zn adsorption constants on carboxylate groups are almost the same, Zn surface adsorption capacities are very different among diatom species which is related to the systematic differences in their cell wall composition and thickness. Measurements of Zn isotopic composition ( 66 Zn/( 64 Zn)) performed using a multicollector ICP MS demonstrated that irreversible incorporation of Zn in cultured diatom cells produces enrichment in heavy isotope compared to growth media (Δ 66 Zn(solid–solution) = 0.27 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.05, 0.21 ± 0.05, and 0.19 ± 0.05‰ for TW, SC, NMIN, and AMIN species, respectively). Accordingly, an enrichment of cells in heavy isotopes (Δ 66 Zn(solid–solution) = 0.43 ± 0.1 and 0.27 ± 0.1‰ for NMIN and AMIN, respectively) is observed following short-term Zn sorption on freshwater cells in nutrient media at pH ∼ 7.8. Finally, diatoms frustules are enriched in heavy isotopes compared to solution during Zn adsorption on silica shells at pH ∼ 5.5 (Δ 66 Zn(solid–solution) = 0.35 ± 0.10‰). Measured isotopes fractionation can be related to the structure and stability of Zn complexes formed and they provide a firm basis for using Zn isotopes for biogeochemical tracing.

Journal

Geochimica et Cosmochimica ActaElsevier

Published: Feb 15, 2006

References

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