Integrating conservation and forestry production: exploring trade-offs between biodiversity and production in regional land-use assessment

Integrating conservation and forestry production: exploring trade-offs between biodiversity and... Regional integration of biodiversity conservation and forestry production requires land-use allocations based on trade-offs that attempt to maximise long-term net benefits to society. In this context, effective surrogate information for biodiversity must be used in order estimate the complementarity value of each area—its unique contribution to biodiversity, given other already-protected areas. Net benefits will be maximised only when the complementarity value for each protected area exceeds its weighted cost or suitability for an alternative land use. This study explored this issue using one particular surrogacy approach, based on environmental data, combined with a recently-developed procedure that incorporates biodiversity assessment into a multi-criteria analysis framework. This procedure, as implemented in a software package DIVERSITY, allows the study of a range of relative weightings on biodiversity protection versus suitabilities for alternative land uses, identifying sets of protected areas that maximise total net benefit. A case study integrating biodiversity and forestry production in the Bateman's Bay region of New South Wales, Australia, is presented, in which the suitabilities for forestry are estimated using a spatial decision-support package, LUPIS. LUPIS is linked to the DIVERSITY package in order to combine exploration of different weightings on various forestry-related criteria with weightings on biodiversity. The results demonstrate that, relative to biodiversity allocations that ignore competing land-uses, taking trade-offs into account can lead in principle to an allocation of protected areas that maintains a high degree of biodiversity representation while reducing conflict with forestry requirements. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forest Ecology and Management Elsevier

Integrating conservation and forestry production: exploring trade-offs between biodiversity and production in regional land-use assessment

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0378-1127
eISSN
1872-7042
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0378-1127(96)03762-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Regional integration of biodiversity conservation and forestry production requires land-use allocations based on trade-offs that attempt to maximise long-term net benefits to society. In this context, effective surrogate information for biodiversity must be used in order estimate the complementarity value of each area—its unique contribution to biodiversity, given other already-protected areas. Net benefits will be maximised only when the complementarity value for each protected area exceeds its weighted cost or suitability for an alternative land use. This study explored this issue using one particular surrogacy approach, based on environmental data, combined with a recently-developed procedure that incorporates biodiversity assessment into a multi-criteria analysis framework. This procedure, as implemented in a software package DIVERSITY, allows the study of a range of relative weightings on biodiversity protection versus suitabilities for alternative land uses, identifying sets of protected areas that maximise total net benefit. A case study integrating biodiversity and forestry production in the Bateman's Bay region of New South Wales, Australia, is presented, in which the suitabilities for forestry are estimated using a spatial decision-support package, LUPIS. LUPIS is linked to the DIVERSITY package in order to combine exploration of different weightings on various forestry-related criteria with weightings on biodiversity. The results demonstrate that, relative to biodiversity allocations that ignore competing land-uses, taking trade-offs into account can lead in principle to an allocation of protected areas that maintains a high degree of biodiversity representation while reducing conflict with forestry requirements.

Journal

Forest Ecology and ManagementElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 1996

References

  • Managing biodiversity in a forestry environment
    Kuusipalo, J.; Kangas, J.

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