Insulin resistance demonstrated by a specific quantitative method in a hyperlipemic laminitic pony

Insulin resistance demonstrated by a specific quantitative method in a hyperlipemic laminitic pony In 1985, Jeffcott and Field 1 proposed a clinical condition in which hyperlipemia and laminitis were associated with stress and insulin insensitivity. Diminished oral glucose tolerance and intravenous insulin tolerance was demonstrated in obese and laminitic ponies compared with normal Standardbred horses. 2 Glucose and insulin tolerance are not, however, specific and unambiguous criteria of insulin sensitivity. 3 Nearly 20 years have transpired before the current specific and quantitative characterization of uncompensated insulin resistance in a hyperlipemic, laminitic pony. A 6-year-old small gelding was 153 kg with a body condition score of 5.5 (out of 9) when referred to the Marion duPont Equine Medical Center. It had a history of chronic respiratory disease, fever, a high Lyme titer, and laminitis. He had been treated with doxycycline and phenylbutazone but failed to respond. His diet had consisted of free choice orchard grass hay and approximately 220 g textured concentrate once a day. Clinical examination of the front feet with hoof testers was strongly positive for pain. Also, a bounding digital pulse was palpated in both front fetlocks. Radiographs showed a bilateral 8° rotation and excessive length of toe. Rectal temperature and heart rate were normal, but the respiratory rate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Elsevier

Insulin resistance demonstrated by a specific quantitative method in a hyperlipemic laminitic pony

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0737-0806
eISSN
1542-7412
DOI
10.1016/j.jevs.2006.04.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1985, Jeffcott and Field 1 proposed a clinical condition in which hyperlipemia and laminitis were associated with stress and insulin insensitivity. Diminished oral glucose tolerance and intravenous insulin tolerance was demonstrated in obese and laminitic ponies compared with normal Standardbred horses. 2 Glucose and insulin tolerance are not, however, specific and unambiguous criteria of insulin sensitivity. 3 Nearly 20 years have transpired before the current specific and quantitative characterization of uncompensated insulin resistance in a hyperlipemic, laminitic pony. A 6-year-old small gelding was 153 kg with a body condition score of 5.5 (out of 9) when referred to the Marion duPont Equine Medical Center. It had a history of chronic respiratory disease, fever, a high Lyme titer, and laminitis. He had been treated with doxycycline and phenylbutazone but failed to respond. His diet had consisted of free choice orchard grass hay and approximately 220 g textured concentrate once a day. Clinical examination of the front feet with hoof testers was strongly positive for pain. Also, a bounding digital pulse was palpated in both front fetlocks. Radiographs showed a bilateral 8° rotation and excessive length of toe. Rectal temperature and heart rate were normal, but the respiratory rate

Journal

Journal of Equine Veterinary ScienceElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2006

References

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