Institutional adaptation to climate change: Flood responses at the municipal level in Norway

Institutional adaptation to climate change: Flood responses at the municipal level in Norway The article examines the role institutions play in climate adaptation in Norway. Using examples from two municipalities in the context of institutional responses to floods, we find, first, that the institutional framework for flood management in Norway gives weak incentives for proactive local flood management. Second, when strong local political and economic interests coincide with national level willingness to pay and provide support, measures are often carried out rapidly at the expense of weaker environmental interests. Third, we find that new perspectives on flood management are more apparent at the national than the municipal level, as new perspectives are filtered by local power structures. The findings have important implications for vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in terms of policy options and the local level as the optimal level for adaptation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Environmental Change Elsevier

Institutional adaptation to climate change: Flood responses at the municipal level in Norway

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-3780
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2004.10.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article examines the role institutions play in climate adaptation in Norway. Using examples from two municipalities in the context of institutional responses to floods, we find, first, that the institutional framework for flood management in Norway gives weak incentives for proactive local flood management. Second, when strong local political and economic interests coincide with national level willingness to pay and provide support, measures are often carried out rapidly at the expense of weaker environmental interests. Third, we find that new perspectives on flood management are more apparent at the national than the municipal level, as new perspectives are filtered by local power structures. The findings have important implications for vulnerability and adaptation to climate change in terms of policy options and the local level as the optimal level for adaptation.

Journal

Global Environmental ChangeElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2005

References

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