Influence of particle shape on slurry wear of white iron

Influence of particle shape on slurry wear of white iron Slurry particle shape is an important variable in determining equipment life in mineral processing operations, especially in the grinding circuit. Slurry particles here are generally coarse, sharp and at high concentrations. Little information is available to guide practitioners in measuring particle shape or understanding the impact of particle shape on the wear rate of the hard white irons that are commonly used in processing equipment.The first part of the current work has explored the differences between 2 methods of measuring particle shape – Circularity Factor (CF) a ratio of the perimeter to projected area of the particles and spike parameter (SPQ) which is an analytical method of fitting triangles to the prominent features of the particle outline. Calculating the CF and SPQ for a wide range of particle shapes (from angular to round) found a close linear correlation between the two. This was surprising given that the more complex SPQ methodology was developed to improve particle shape characterisation.The second part of the work used a large scale Coriolis tester to determine the effect of particles of different shape on the wear rate of white cast iron. To simulate the type of wear experienced in grinding circuits a range of different particle shapes with similar CF to those observed in field applications were tested. Coarse silicon carbide, alumina and silica sand particles were individually run through the Coriolis tester. By recirculating the particles in the rig, the shape became more rounded (with CF eventually spanning the range seen in field applications) without dramatically impacting particle size. An inverse power law relationship was found between the CF and the erosion rate for white iron. This correlation should be able to be used to determine the impact of changes in CF on equipment wear life.A third element of the work was a microscopic investigation of the worn sample surface from the Coriolis tester to identify changes in wear mechanisms with particle hardness and shape. In addition a comparison was made with worn slurry pump parts to ensure that the mechanisms of wear from the Coriolis test were representative of those seen in equipment in the field. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Influence of particle shape on slurry wear of white iron

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/influence-of-particle-shape-on-slurry-wear-of-white-iron-0qGbos6XfW
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.wear.2014.12.029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Slurry particle shape is an important variable in determining equipment life in mineral processing operations, especially in the grinding circuit. Slurry particles here are generally coarse, sharp and at high concentrations. Little information is available to guide practitioners in measuring particle shape or understanding the impact of particle shape on the wear rate of the hard white irons that are commonly used in processing equipment.The first part of the current work has explored the differences between 2 methods of measuring particle shape – Circularity Factor (CF) a ratio of the perimeter to projected area of the particles and spike parameter (SPQ) which is an analytical method of fitting triangles to the prominent features of the particle outline. Calculating the CF and SPQ for a wide range of particle shapes (from angular to round) found a close linear correlation between the two. This was surprising given that the more complex SPQ methodology was developed to improve particle shape characterisation.The second part of the work used a large scale Coriolis tester to determine the effect of particles of different shape on the wear rate of white cast iron. To simulate the type of wear experienced in grinding circuits a range of different particle shapes with similar CF to those observed in field applications were tested. Coarse silicon carbide, alumina and silica sand particles were individually run through the Coriolis tester. By recirculating the particles in the rig, the shape became more rounded (with CF eventually spanning the range seen in field applications) without dramatically impacting particle size. An inverse power law relationship was found between the CF and the erosion rate for white iron. This correlation should be able to be used to determine the impact of changes in CF on equipment wear life.A third element of the work was a microscopic investigation of the worn sample surface from the Coriolis tester to identify changes in wear mechanisms with particle hardness and shape. In addition a comparison was made with worn slurry pump parts to ensure that the mechanisms of wear from the Coriolis test were representative of those seen in equipment in the field.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: May 1, 2015

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off