Influence of diet on ongrowing and nutrient utilization in the common octopus ( Octopus vulgaris )

Influence of diet on ongrowing and nutrient utilization in the common octopus ( Octopus vulgaris ) Octopus vulgaris ongrowing has recently begun to develop in Spanish coastal waters. The need to diversify aquaculture products in terms of its biological and market potential makes octopus a serious candidate for rearing. Ongrowing success depends on several factors, such as environmental rearing conditions, diet and nutritive utilization. Two fresh diets of low market value ( Boops boops and Sardina pilchardus ) were used to assess growth rate, feeding rate and efficiency by means of multiple regression analysis. Factors considered were sex and diet as qualitative variables, and body weight and temperature as quantitative ones. No significant differences were observed regarding growth and sex although it was slightly higher in males. Nevertheless, food intake was higher in females as well as in the sardine-fed females. Growth with bogue-fed octopus was significantly higher. Smaller specimens grew more than the larger ones in proportion to initial body weight. The rise in temperature increased growth and food intake over our experimental range. Differences in growth may have been due to the different lipid content of the diets since digestibility of lipid in cephalopods is poor and their main energy source is protein. The higher food intake in females may be caused by metabolic changes related to the reproduction period although this remains to be confirmed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aquaculture Elsevier

Influence of diet on ongrowing and nutrient utilization in the common octopus ( Octopus vulgaris )

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/influence-of-diet-on-ongrowing-and-nutrient-utilization-in-the-common-xFF2kLp409
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0044-8486
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0044-8486(01)00788-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Octopus vulgaris ongrowing has recently begun to develop in Spanish coastal waters. The need to diversify aquaculture products in terms of its biological and market potential makes octopus a serious candidate for rearing. Ongrowing success depends on several factors, such as environmental rearing conditions, diet and nutritive utilization. Two fresh diets of low market value ( Boops boops and Sardina pilchardus ) were used to assess growth rate, feeding rate and efficiency by means of multiple regression analysis. Factors considered were sex and diet as qualitative variables, and body weight and temperature as quantitative ones. No significant differences were observed regarding growth and sex although it was slightly higher in males. Nevertheless, food intake was higher in females as well as in the sardine-fed females. Growth with bogue-fed octopus was significantly higher. Smaller specimens grew more than the larger ones in proportion to initial body weight. The rise in temperature increased growth and food intake over our experimental range. Differences in growth may have been due to the different lipid content of the diets since digestibility of lipid in cephalopods is poor and their main energy source is protein. The higher food intake in females may be caused by metabolic changes related to the reproduction period although this remains to be confirmed.

Journal

AquacultureElsevier

Published: Aug 23, 2002

References

  • Fish Nutrition
    Halver, J.E
  • New data on reproductive biology and growth of Octopus vulgaris
    Mangold, K.M; von Boletzky, S.V
  • The development of growth and feeding equations for sea bream, Sparus aurata L., culture
    Petridis, D; Rogdakis, I
  • Octopus
    Wells, M.J
  • The bioenergetics of the southern catfish ( Silurus meridionalis , Chen): growth rate as a function of ration level, body weight, and temperature
    Xie, J.L; Sun, R

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off