10.1016/S0166-0934(99)00105-6

10.1016/S0166-0934(99)00105-6 1 <h5>Introduction</h5> Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a small, naked (non-enveloped) icosahedral virus with 5.6 Kb of single-stranded DNA. It was detected originally in the sera of healthy blood donors by Cossart et al. (1975) . B19 is the etiologic agent of a common childhood disease, erythema infectiosum or ‘fifth’ disease ( Anderson et al., 1983 ). However, in some specific cases, B19 can causes arthritis in adults ( Reid et al., 1985; White et al., 1985 ), aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia ( Pattison et al., 1981; Serjeant et al., 1981; Saarinen et al., 1986 ), chronic anemia ( Kurtzman et al., 1988 ) in immunodeficient patients and hydrops fetalis during pregnancy ( Anand et al., 1987 ). Recently, B19 DNA was detected by PCR in 20% of batches of solvent/detergent-treated clotting factor concentrates, factor VIII and factor IX ( Lefrere et al., 1994 ). The report suggests the possibility of B19 infection by transfusion with contaminated blood products. Thus, despite currently available methods, such as, PCR ( Clewley, 1989 ), DNA hybridization ( Zerbini et al., 1990 ) and receptor-mediated hemagglutination(RHA) ( Sato et al., 1995 ), there is a need for a practical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

10.1016/S0166-0934(99)00105-6

Elsevier — Jun 11, 2020

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Elsevier

Abstract

1 <h5>Introduction</h5> Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a small, naked (non-enveloped) icosahedral virus with 5.6 Kb of single-stranded DNA. It was detected originally in the sera of healthy blood donors by Cossart et al. (1975) . B19 is the etiologic agent of a common childhood disease, erythema infectiosum or ‘fifth’ disease ( Anderson et al., 1983 ). However, in some specific cases, B19 can causes arthritis in adults ( Reid et al., 1985; White et al., 1985 ), aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia ( Pattison et al., 1981; Serjeant et al., 1981; Saarinen et al., 1986 ), chronic anemia ( Kurtzman et al., 1988 ) in immunodeficient patients and hydrops fetalis during pregnancy ( Anand et al., 1987 ). Recently, B19 DNA was detected by PCR in 20% of batches of solvent/detergent-treated clotting factor concentrates, factor VIII and factor IX ( Lefrere et al., 1994 ). The report suggests the possibility of B19 infection by transfusion with contaminated blood products. Thus, despite currently available methods, such as, PCR ( Clewley, 1989 ), DNA hybridization ( Zerbini et al., 1990 ) and receptor-mediated hemagglutination(RHA) ( Sato et al., 1995 ), there is a need for a practical

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