Including biotic interactions with ungulate prey and humans improves habitat conservation modeling for endangered Amur tigers in the Russian Far East

Including biotic interactions with ungulate prey and humans improves habitat conservation... 1 Introduction</h5> The precipitous decline in wild tiger ( Panthera tigris ) numbers over the past century has received wide attention ( Dinerstein et al., 2007; Walston et al., 2010 ) and has generated a recent high-profile global conservation response (Global Tiger Initiative, 2010 ). In 2010, the political leaders of the 13 tiger range nations met in St. Petersburg and boldly committed to “double the number of wild tigers across their range by 2022”. Habitat loss is generally recognized as one of the three key threats driving the tiger decline (along with poaching and prey depletion) with an estimated 93% of tiger habitat lost in the last century ( Dinerstein et al., 2007 ). One of the primary means to achieve the Global Tiger Initiatives bold goal is the identification, conservation and restoration of tiger habitat ( Dinerstein et al., 2007; Smith et al., 1998; Wikramanayake et al., 2011 ).</P>Many large-scale habitat-modeling exercises are often forced to rely on incomplete information about habitat parameters. With few exceptions, it has only been recently that extensive countrywide surveys have been conducted to fully map tiger distribution ( Jhala et al., 2011; Miquelle et al., 2006; Wibisono et al., 2011 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Including biotic interactions with ungulate prey and humans improves habitat conservation modeling for endangered Amur tigers in the Russian Far East

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.biocon.2014.07.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The precipitous decline in wild tiger ( Panthera tigris ) numbers over the past century has received wide attention ( Dinerstein et al., 2007; Walston et al., 2010 ) and has generated a recent high-profile global conservation response (Global Tiger Initiative, 2010 ). In 2010, the political leaders of the 13 tiger range nations met in St. Petersburg and boldly committed to “double the number of wild tigers across their range by 2022”. Habitat loss is generally recognized as one of the three key threats driving the tiger decline (along with poaching and prey depletion) with an estimated 93% of tiger habitat lost in the last century ( Dinerstein et al., 2007 ). One of the primary means to achieve the Global Tiger Initiatives bold goal is the identification, conservation and restoration of tiger habitat ( Dinerstein et al., 2007; Smith et al., 1998; Wikramanayake et al., 2011 ).</P>Many large-scale habitat-modeling exercises are often forced to rely on incomplete information about habitat parameters. With few exceptions, it has only been recently that extensive countrywide surveys have been conducted to fully map tiger distribution ( Jhala et al., 2011; Miquelle et al., 2006; Wibisono et al., 2011

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2014

References

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