Incidence, Predictors, and Impact on Six-Month Mortality of Three Different Definitions of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography

Incidence, Predictors, and Impact on Six-Month Mortality of Three Different Definitions of... We assessed incidence, predictors, and impact on 6-month mortality of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after coronary angiography with or without percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to 3 different CI-AKI definitions.Serum creatinine (sCr) was assessed at baseline and 48 to 72 hours after procedure to classify patients into 3 CI-AKI groups: Group 1: increase in sCR ≥25% over baseline but absolute increase <0.5 mg/dl; Group 2: absolute increase ≥0.5 mg/dl; Group 3: absolute increase ≥0.3 mg/dl or ≥50% over baseline. The association between CI-AKI and all-cause 6-month mortality was assessed using multivariate Cox regression. Among 1,002 patients included, median age was 68 [57 to 79] years. The sample had the following characteristics: 70% men, 25% diabetics, 22% had a history of myocardial infarction, 21% had baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (as calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease)  <60 ml/min/1.72 m2, 34% had ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 61% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, and 43% had multivessel disease. Based on changes in sCr, 89 patients (8.9%) were classified in Group 1; 69 (6.9%) in Group 2; and 157 (15.7%) in Group 3, whereas sCr did not increase >25% in the remaining 844 (84.2%). CI-AKI was significantly associated with 6-month all-cause mortality using the definitions for Group 2 (hazard ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 6.6, p = 0.002) and Group 3 (hazard ratio 2.03, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.0, p = 0.04), but not Group 1. In conclusion, based on the definition used for CI-AKI, CI-AKI is observed in 6% to 15.7% of patients. An increase of 25% over baseline sCr does not identify high-risk patients. CI-AKI defined as an increase in sCr >0.3 mg/dl identifies 15.7% of the population at 2-fold higher risk of mortality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Cardiology Elsevier

Incidence, Predictors, and Impact on Six-Month Mortality of Three Different Definitions of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Coronary Angiography

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0002-9149
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.12.029
Publisher site
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Abstract

We assessed incidence, predictors, and impact on 6-month mortality of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after coronary angiography with or without percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to 3 different CI-AKI definitions.Serum creatinine (sCr) was assessed at baseline and 48 to 72 hours after procedure to classify patients into 3 CI-AKI groups: Group 1: increase in sCR ≥25% over baseline but absolute increase <0.5 mg/dl; Group 2: absolute increase ≥0.5 mg/dl; Group 3: absolute increase ≥0.3 mg/dl or ≥50% over baseline. The association between CI-AKI and all-cause 6-month mortality was assessed using multivariate Cox regression. Among 1,002 patients included, median age was 68 [57 to 79] years. The sample had the following characteristics: 70% men, 25% diabetics, 22% had a history of myocardial infarction, 21% had baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (as calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease)  <60 ml/min/1.72 m2, 34% had ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 61% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, and 43% had multivessel disease. Based on changes in sCr, 89 patients (8.9%) were classified in Group 1; 69 (6.9%) in Group 2; and 157 (15.7%) in Group 3, whereas sCr did not increase >25% in the remaining 844 (84.2%). CI-AKI was significantly associated with 6-month all-cause mortality using the definitions for Group 2 (hazard ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 6.6, p = 0.002) and Group 3 (hazard ratio 2.03, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.0, p = 0.04), but not Group 1. In conclusion, based on the definition used for CI-AKI, CI-AKI is observed in 6% to 15.7% of patients. An increase of 25% over baseline sCr does not identify high-risk patients. CI-AKI defined as an increase in sCr >0.3 mg/dl identifies 15.7% of the population at 2-fold higher risk of mortality.

Journal

The American Journal of CardiologyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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