In vitro evaluation and physicochemical characteristics of casein phosphopeptides-soluble dietary fibers copolymers as a novel calcium delivery system

In vitro evaluation and physicochemical characteristics of casein phosphopeptides-soluble... The absorption of calcium by the human body is limited due to the formation of calcium phosphate deposits during gastrointestinal digestion. A new type of calcium delivery system was established using casein phosphopeptides (CPP) and soluble dietary fibers (SDF) through covalent binding. The physicochemical properties, morphology, calcium binding mechanisms, and in vitro calcium release behavior of the prepared CPP-SDF copolymers in a simulated gastrointestinal tract were investigated. The results showed that the maximum calcium binding level of the copolymers reached 46.8%, 35.17% (p < 0.05) greater than that of the original CPP. The calcium binding mechanism of the copolymers was the chemical grafting of active groups; exposed -CO-NH, -COOH and -OH groups and the imidazole group of His served as the major binding sites. In addition, the grafted SDF formed a shell to diminish the digestion of peptides and prolong the release of calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, the prepared CPP-SDF copolymers are a promising calcium delivery vehicle for improving calcium bioavailability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Hydrocolloids Elsevier

In vitro evaluation and physicochemical characteristics of casein phosphopeptides-soluble dietary fibers copolymers as a novel calcium delivery system

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/in-vitro-evaluation-and-physicochemical-characteristics-of-casein-a7xWkc6NfQ
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0268-005X
eISSN
1873-7137
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodhyd.2018.01.024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The absorption of calcium by the human body is limited due to the formation of calcium phosphate deposits during gastrointestinal digestion. A new type of calcium delivery system was established using casein phosphopeptides (CPP) and soluble dietary fibers (SDF) through covalent binding. The physicochemical properties, morphology, calcium binding mechanisms, and in vitro calcium release behavior of the prepared CPP-SDF copolymers in a simulated gastrointestinal tract were investigated. The results showed that the maximum calcium binding level of the copolymers reached 46.8%, 35.17% (p < 0.05) greater than that of the original CPP. The calcium binding mechanism of the copolymers was the chemical grafting of active groups; exposed -CO-NH, -COOH and -OH groups and the imidazole group of His served as the major binding sites. In addition, the grafted SDF formed a shell to diminish the digestion of peptides and prolong the release of calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, the prepared CPP-SDF copolymers are a promising calcium delivery vehicle for improving calcium bioavailability.

Journal

Food HydrocolloidsElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off