In vitro digestion of nanoscale starch particles and evolution of thermal, morphological, and structural characteristics

In vitro digestion of nanoscale starch particles and evolution of thermal, morphological, and... In vitro digestions of starch nanocrystals (SNCs), prepared by acid hydrolysis of native starch and starch nanoparticles (SNPs) fabricated by self-assembly of short glucan chains, were investigated for kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis. Their thermal, morphological, and structural properties during amylolysis were also compared. The kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis indicated that the hydrolysis rate of SNPs was lowest in that of SNCs, cooked starch, and native starch. Onset, peak, conclusion temperatures, and enthalpy of gelatinization of SNPs and SNCs decreased during digestion. The A-type crystallization of SNCs contributed to their higher rate of hydrolysis than that of SNPs, which was B-type. The relative crystallinity of SNCs during hydrolysis decreased but that of SNPs increased. The results suggest that SNPs exhibit higher resistance to digestion than SNCs. This finding provides information for diverse potential applications of SNCs and SNPs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Hydrocolloids Elsevier

In vitro digestion of nanoscale starch particles and evolution of thermal, morphological, and structural characteristics

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0268-005X
eISSN
1873-7137
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodhyd.2016.05.039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In vitro digestions of starch nanocrystals (SNCs), prepared by acid hydrolysis of native starch and starch nanoparticles (SNPs) fabricated by self-assembly of short glucan chains, were investigated for kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis. Their thermal, morphological, and structural properties during amylolysis were also compared. The kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis indicated that the hydrolysis rate of SNPs was lowest in that of SNCs, cooked starch, and native starch. Onset, peak, conclusion temperatures, and enthalpy of gelatinization of SNPs and SNCs decreased during digestion. The A-type crystallization of SNCs contributed to their higher rate of hydrolysis than that of SNPs, which was B-type. The relative crystallinity of SNCs during hydrolysis decreased but that of SNPs increased. The results suggest that SNPs exhibit higher resistance to digestion than SNCs. This finding provides information for diverse potential applications of SNCs and SNPs.

Journal

Food HydrocolloidsElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2016

References

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