In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study 1 Introduction</h5> Arsenic in aquifer sediments can be released into groundwater under various hydrogeological and geochemical conditions, causing abnormal elevated arsenic concentrations ( Nordstrom, 2002 ). Long-term consumption of groundwater containing high concentration of arsenic can cause various human health problems, including skin cancer, lung cancer, liver and kidney diseases ( Duker et al., 2005 ). The World Health Organization (WHO) has set the limit of arsenic in drinking water at 10 μg/L ( WHO, 2011 ). High arsenic groundwater occurs widely around the world, and millions of people from more than 70 regions are suffering from arsenic exposure in varying degrees, especially those living in India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Burma, Chile, Argentina, Hungary, the United States and China ( Nordstrom, 2002; Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002 ). In China, high arsenic groundwater has been observed in Datong basin of Shanxi Province, Hetao basin of Inner Mongolia and in Xinjiang and Taiwan Provinces where approximately 18.5 million people are at risk exposing to high arsenic groundwater. The groundwater arsenic level reaches a magnitude of 1–2 mg/L ( Guo et al., 2014; Xie et al., 2009; Xie et al., 2008 ).</P>To remove arsenic from groundwater, various remediation technologies have been developed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science of the Total Environment Elsevier

In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Arsenic in aquifer sediments can be released into groundwater under various hydrogeological and geochemical conditions, causing abnormal elevated arsenic concentrations ( Nordstrom, 2002 ). Long-term consumption of groundwater containing high concentration of arsenic can cause various human health problems, including skin cancer, lung cancer, liver and kidney diseases ( Duker et al., 2005 ). The World Health Organization (WHO) has set the limit of arsenic in drinking water at 10 μg/L ( WHO, 2011 ). High arsenic groundwater occurs widely around the world, and millions of people from more than 70 regions are suffering from arsenic exposure in varying degrees, especially those living in India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Burma, Chile, Argentina, Hungary, the United States and China ( Nordstrom, 2002; Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002 ). In China, high arsenic groundwater has been observed in Datong basin of Shanxi Province, Hetao basin of Inner Mongolia and in Xinjiang and Taiwan Provinces where approximately 18.5 million people are at risk exposing to high arsenic groundwater. The groundwater arsenic level reaches a magnitude of 1–2 mg/L ( Guo et al., 2014; Xie et al., 2009; Xie et al., 2008 ).</P>To remove arsenic from groundwater, various remediation technologies have been developed

Journal

Science of the Total EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Sep 15, 2015

References

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