In-situ CO2 generation huff-n-puff for enhanced oil recovery: Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

In-situ CO2 generation huff-n-puff for enhanced oil recovery: Laboratory experiments and... The major objective of this paper was to evaluate the validity of in-situ CO2 generation technique as an enhanced oil recovery method in sandstone reservoirs. In this study, the endothermic decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate solution was used to generate CO2. The theoretical prediction model of generated CO2 volume under reservoir conditions was deduced from the reaction kinetics. It was verified by the experimental data from gas-forming reaction test. The results indicated that the prediction based on the established theoretical model was well matched to experimental results at the tested NH4HCO3 concentrations of 10, 15, 20wt%. The oil displacement efficiency of in-situ CO2 generation huff-n-puff (ISCGHP) were further examined through both sandpack test and reservoir simulation. The gas-forming agent was composed of ammonium bicarbonate, surfactants and polymers. The displacement performance of ISCGHP was examined through the sandpack huff-n-puff test. Effects of the main injection parameters were analyzed, including concentration, slug size, injection mode and chasing water. The sandpack huff-n-puff test indicated that a higher concentration of NH4HCO3 and a larger slug size of reagent contributed to an improved oil displacement efficiency. Gradually increasing the slug size reached the remaining oil left in the previous cycle, and simultaneously enlarged swept volume in the following cycle. In the numerical study, the reservoir model of ISCGHP was established using data from interfacial tension test, PVT test and reaction kinetics. It was then calibrated based on sandpack test results and past production observations of the candidate-well. Results showed ISCGHP effectively improved single-well productivity with a growth rate of 56% in oil production, the effective sweep radius reached about 50m away from the wellbore along with a slight fall of formation temperature and a maximal 22.8% of oil viscosity reduction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering Elsevier

In-situ CO2 generation huff-n-puff for enhanced oil recovery: Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0920-4105
eISSN
1873-4715
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.petrol.2016.04.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The major objective of this paper was to evaluate the validity of in-situ CO2 generation technique as an enhanced oil recovery method in sandstone reservoirs. In this study, the endothermic decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate solution was used to generate CO2. The theoretical prediction model of generated CO2 volume under reservoir conditions was deduced from the reaction kinetics. It was verified by the experimental data from gas-forming reaction test. The results indicated that the prediction based on the established theoretical model was well matched to experimental results at the tested NH4HCO3 concentrations of 10, 15, 20wt%. The oil displacement efficiency of in-situ CO2 generation huff-n-puff (ISCGHP) were further examined through both sandpack test and reservoir simulation. The gas-forming agent was composed of ammonium bicarbonate, surfactants and polymers. The displacement performance of ISCGHP was examined through the sandpack huff-n-puff test. Effects of the main injection parameters were analyzed, including concentration, slug size, injection mode and chasing water. The sandpack huff-n-puff test indicated that a higher concentration of NH4HCO3 and a larger slug size of reagent contributed to an improved oil displacement efficiency. Gradually increasing the slug size reached the remaining oil left in the previous cycle, and simultaneously enlarged swept volume in the following cycle. In the numerical study, the reservoir model of ISCGHP was established using data from interfacial tension test, PVT test and reaction kinetics. It was then calibrated based on sandpack test results and past production observations of the candidate-well. Results showed ISCGHP effectively improved single-well productivity with a growth rate of 56% in oil production, the effective sweep radius reached about 50m away from the wellbore along with a slight fall of formation temperature and a maximal 22.8% of oil viscosity reduction.

Journal

Journal of Petroleum Science and EngineeringElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2016

References

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