In situ and laboratory tests on a novel offshore mixed-in-place pile for oil and gas platforms

In situ and laboratory tests on a novel offshore mixed-in-place pile for oil and gas platforms For the majority of offshore jackets, driven piles are the preferred foundation solution; however difficult soil conditions may preclude conventional pile driving. In such circumstances, methods of grouting a pile into an oversized hole or drilling and underreaming for a cast-in-place pile have received considerable attention. Drilled-and-grouted (D&G) piles are normally used in challenging geologies, such as very dense sands, very stiff clays and in calcareous deposits. However, D&G piles are normally time-consuming to construct. To address this challenge, the MIDOS pile system, which minimizes the number of offshore operations, was created and subjected to a suite of field tests. Cyclic tests were conducted on a pile installed in a silica sand deposit, where over 1000 loading cycles in between 1000kN and 5000kN (in tension) were applied. The evaluation of the cyclic test data clearly shows that the serviceability of the pile is unaffected by the cyclic loads. A feasibility study of the MIDOS pile in carbonate sands (Dog's Bay sand) was also explored in a laboratory test program. Carbonate sands are particularly relevant for drilled foundation solutions as the shaft friction of driven piles is typically very low due to the high radial contraction of such material adjacent to the pile shaft during impact driving. A finite element model (FEM) developed for this calcareous sand was used to compare the lab test results. The outcome of the laboratory testing program demonstrated that the MIDOS pile would have similar geotechnical and structural properties in both calcareous and siliceous deposits, suggesting that this novel offshore foundation type is suitable for a range of sand conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering Elsevier

In situ and laboratory tests on a novel offshore mixed-in-place pile for oil and gas platforms

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/in-situ-and-laboratory-tests-on-a-novel-offshore-mixed-in-place-pile-00Q0ShKEY5
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0920-4105
eISSN
1873-4715
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.petrol.2016.06.027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For the majority of offshore jackets, driven piles are the preferred foundation solution; however difficult soil conditions may preclude conventional pile driving. In such circumstances, methods of grouting a pile into an oversized hole or drilling and underreaming for a cast-in-place pile have received considerable attention. Drilled-and-grouted (D&G) piles are normally used in challenging geologies, such as very dense sands, very stiff clays and in calcareous deposits. However, D&G piles are normally time-consuming to construct. To address this challenge, the MIDOS pile system, which minimizes the number of offshore operations, was created and subjected to a suite of field tests. Cyclic tests were conducted on a pile installed in a silica sand deposit, where over 1000 loading cycles in between 1000kN and 5000kN (in tension) were applied. The evaluation of the cyclic test data clearly shows that the serviceability of the pile is unaffected by the cyclic loads. A feasibility study of the MIDOS pile in carbonate sands (Dog's Bay sand) was also explored in a laboratory test program. Carbonate sands are particularly relevant for drilled foundation solutions as the shaft friction of driven piles is typically very low due to the high radial contraction of such material adjacent to the pile shaft during impact driving. A finite element model (FEM) developed for this calcareous sand was used to compare the lab test results. The outcome of the laboratory testing program demonstrated that the MIDOS pile would have similar geotechnical and structural properties in both calcareous and siliceous deposits, suggesting that this novel offshore foundation type is suitable for a range of sand conditions.

Journal

Journal of Petroleum Science and EngineeringElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off