In-process structuring of CrN coatings, and its influence on friction in dry and lubricated sliding

In-process structuring of CrN coatings, and its influence on friction in dry and lubricated sliding The growing trend to improve component lifetimes coupled with the need to conserve resources is driving new technologies in fields such as tool and forming industries. The use of in-process structuring applied to hard coatings on surfaces is one way of creating lubricating surfaces on the microscale, with superior tribological properties and improved lifetimes. In this study, CrN coatings deposited by plasma-activated physical vapor deposition (PAPVD) on hard metal substrates were structured by variation of the deposition parameters. The parameter combinations favorable for surface structuring were identified. Of the various deposition parameters that were varied in this study, the bias voltage was determined to have a dominating influence on the surface structure of the coatings. A wide variety of structures were fabricated, ranging from flat to highly creviced, with grain sizes ranging from 5 to 500 nm, as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Profilometer measurements show that the surface roughness, R a , could be varied from 0.04 to 0.12 μm. The highly creviced surfaces however exhibit a somewhat reduced hardness as well as lower adhesion to the substrates, relative to flat CrN surfaces. Even so, ball-on-disk (BoD) experiments, performed under conditions of minimum lubrication at high loads exhibited a longer wear life on the highly structured coatings compared to the relatively flat, unstructured surfaces. This is attributed to lubricant accumulation in microfissures present in the structured coatings. These microreservoirs not only provide critical lubrication at the contacting surfaces but also act as traps for wear-generated debris. Furthermore, the advantages of surface structuring are even more evident under low load conditions; this effect is the result of the reduced contact area and directed lubrication provided by the surface structuring. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

In-process structuring of CrN coatings, and its influence on friction in dry and lubricated sliding

Wear, Volume 254 (11) – Oct 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/in-process-structuring-of-crn-coatings-and-its-influence-on-friction-sdiyS48OPJ
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0043-1648(03)00342-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The growing trend to improve component lifetimes coupled with the need to conserve resources is driving new technologies in fields such as tool and forming industries. The use of in-process structuring applied to hard coatings on surfaces is one way of creating lubricating surfaces on the microscale, with superior tribological properties and improved lifetimes. In this study, CrN coatings deposited by plasma-activated physical vapor deposition (PAPVD) on hard metal substrates were structured by variation of the deposition parameters. The parameter combinations favorable for surface structuring were identified. Of the various deposition parameters that were varied in this study, the bias voltage was determined to have a dominating influence on the surface structure of the coatings. A wide variety of structures were fabricated, ranging from flat to highly creviced, with grain sizes ranging from 5 to 500 nm, as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Profilometer measurements show that the surface roughness, R a , could be varied from 0.04 to 0.12 μm. The highly creviced surfaces however exhibit a somewhat reduced hardness as well as lower adhesion to the substrates, relative to flat CrN surfaces. Even so, ball-on-disk (BoD) experiments, performed under conditions of minimum lubrication at high loads exhibited a longer wear life on the highly structured coatings compared to the relatively flat, unstructured surfaces. This is attributed to lubricant accumulation in microfissures present in the structured coatings. These microreservoirs not only provide critical lubrication at the contacting surfaces but also act as traps for wear-generated debris. Furthermore, the advantages of surface structuring are even more evident under low load conditions; this effect is the result of the reduced contact area and directed lubrication provided by the surface structuring.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2003

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off