Improvements and cost-effective measures to the automated intermittent water renewal system for toxicity testing with sediments

Improvements and cost-effective measures to the automated intermittent water renewal system for... The push to make bioassays more sensitive has meant an increased duration of testing to look at more chronic endpoints. To conduct these longer bioassays through the use of traditional bioassay methods can be difficult, as many traditional bioassays have employed manual water changes, which take considerable time and effort. To that end, static-renewal systems were designed to provide researchers a technique to ease the manual water change burden. One of the most well-known static-renewal designs, the static intermittent renewal system (STIR) was produced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 1993. This system is still being used in laboratories across the globe today. However, these initial designs have become rather dated as new technologies and methods have been developed that make these systems easier to build and operate. The following information details changes to the initial design and a proof of concept experiment with the benthic invertebrate, Chironomus tepperi, to validate the modifications to the original system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Elsevier

Improvements and cost-effective measures to the automated intermittent water renewal system for toxicity testing with sediments

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0147-6513
eISSN
1090-2414
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.12.051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The push to make bioassays more sensitive has meant an increased duration of testing to look at more chronic endpoints. To conduct these longer bioassays through the use of traditional bioassay methods can be difficult, as many traditional bioassays have employed manual water changes, which take considerable time and effort. To that end, static-renewal systems were designed to provide researchers a technique to ease the manual water change burden. One of the most well-known static-renewal designs, the static intermittent renewal system (STIR) was produced by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 1993. This system is still being used in laboratories across the globe today. However, these initial designs have become rather dated as new technologies and methods have been developed that make these systems easier to build and operate. The following information details changes to the initial design and a proof of concept experiment with the benthic invertebrate, Chironomus tepperi, to validate the modifications to the original system.

Journal

Ecotoxicology and Environmental SafetyElsevier

Published: Apr 30, 2018

References

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